Lingthusiasm

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Website
http://soundcloud.com/lingthusiasm
Description
Lingthusiasm is a podcast that’s enthusiastic about linguistics, hosted by Lauren Gawne (www.superlinguo​.com) and Gretchen McCulloch (www.allthingslinguistic.com)
Language
🇬🇧 English
last modified
2019-08-17 09:44
last episode published
2019-08-16 00:34
publication frequency
28.72 days
Contributors
Lingthusiasm owner   author  
Explicit
false
Number of Episodes
35
Rss-Feeds
Detail page
Categories
Society & Culture

Recommendations


Episodes

Date Thumb Title & Description Contributors
16.08.2019 http://i1.sndcdn.com/avatars-000283544519-wbxw6j-original.jpg

35: Putting sounds into syllables is like putting toppings on a burger

Sometimes a syllable is jam-packed with sounds, like the single-syllable word “strengths”. Other times, a syllable is as simple as a single vowel or consonant+vowel, like the two syllables in “a-ha!” It’s kind of like a burger: you might pack your burg...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne author
18.07.2019 http://i1.sndcdn.com/avatars-000283544519-wbxw6j-original.jpg

34: Emoji are Gesture Because Internet

Emoji make a lot of headlines, but what happens when you actually drill down into the data for how people integrate emoji into our everyday messages? It turns out that how we use emoji has a surprising number of similarities with how we use gesture. ...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne author
20.06.2019 http://i1.sndcdn.com/avatars-000283544519-wbxw6j-original.jpg

33: Why spelling is hard — but also hard to change

Why does “gh” make different sounds in “though” “through” “laugh” “light” and “ghost”? Why is there a silent “k” at the beginning of words like “know” and “knight”? And which other languages also have interesting historical artefacts in their spelling ...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne author
16.05.2019 http://i1.sndcdn.com/avatars-000283544519-wbxw6j-original.jpg

32: You heard about it but I was there - Evidentiality

Sometimes, you know something for sure. You were there. You witnessed it. And you want to make sure that anyone who hears about it from you knows that you’re a direct source. Other times, you weren’t there, but you still have news. Maybe you found it o...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne author
19.04.2019 http://i1.sndcdn.com/avatars-000283544519-wbxw6j-original.jpg

31: Pop culture in Cook Islands Māori - Interview with Ake Nicholas

When a language is shifting from being spoken by a whole community to being spoken only by older people, it’s crucial to get the kids engaged with the language again. But kids don’t always appreciate the interests of their elders, especially when globa...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne author
21.03.2019 http://i1.sndcdn.com/avatars-000283544519-wbxw6j-original.jpg

30: Why do we gesture when we talk?

This episode is also available as a special video episode so you can see the gestures! Go to youtube.com/lingthusiasm or https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u8dHtr7uLHs to watch it! When you describe to someone a ball bouncing down a hill, one of the eas...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne author
22.02.2019 http://i1.sndcdn.com/avatars-000283544519-wbxw6j-original.jpg

29: The verb is the coat rack that the rest of the sentence hangs on

Some sentences have a lot of words all relating to each other, while other sentences only have a few. The verb is the thing that makes the biggest difference: it’s what makes “I gave you the book” sound fine but “I rained you the book” sound weird. Or ...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne on the science of language author
18.01.2019 http://i1.sndcdn.com/avatars-000283544519-wbxw6j-original.jpg

28: How languages influence each other - Hannah Gibson interview on Swahili, Rangi & Bantu languages

The Rift Valley area of central and northern Tanzania is the only area where languages from all four African language families are found (Bantu, Cushitic, Nilotic, and Khoisan). Languages in this area have been in contact with each other for a long tim...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne on the science of language author
20.12.2018 http://i1.sndcdn.com/avatars-000283544519-wbxw6j-original.jpg

27: Words for family relationships: Kinship terms

There are certain things that human societies, and therefore languages, have in common. We have the same basic inventory of body parts, which affect both the kinds of movements we can make to produce words and the names we have for our meat-selves. We’...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne on the science of language author
16.11.2018 http://i1.sndcdn.com/avatars-000283544519-wbxw6j-original.jpg

26: Why do C and G come in hard and soft versions? Palatalization

A letter stands for a sound. Or at least, it’s supposed to. Most of the time. Unless it’s C or G, which each stand for two different sounds in a whole bunch of languages. C can be soft, as in circus or acacia, or hard, as in the other C in circus or ac...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne on the science of language author
18.10.2018 http://i1.sndcdn.com/avatars-000283544519-wbxw6j-original.jpg

25: Every word is a real word

squishable, blobfish, aaarggghh, gubernatorial, apple lovers, ain’t, tronc, wug, toast, toast, toast, toast, toast. All of these are words that someone, somewhere has asserted aren’t real words – or maybe aren’t even words at all. But we don’t point a...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne on the science of language author
20.09.2018 http://i1.sndcdn.com/avatars-000283544519-wbxw6j-original.jpg

24: Making books and tools speak Chatino - Interview with Hilaria Cruz

As English speakers, we take for granted that we have lots of resources available in our language, from children’s books to dictionaries to automated tools like Siri and Google Translate. But for the majority of the world’s languages, this is not the c...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne on the science of language author
16.08.2018 http://i1.sndcdn.com/avatars-000283544519-wbxw6j-original.jpg

23: When nothing means something

When we think about language, we generally think about things that are visible or audible: letters, sounds, signs, words, symbols, sentences. We don’t often think about the lack of anything. But little bits of silence or invisibility are found surprisi...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne on the science of language author
19.07.2018 http://i1.sndcdn.com/avatars-000283544519-wbxw6j-original.jpg

22: This, that and the other thing - determiners

When linguists think about complicated words, we don’t think about rare, two-dollar words like “defenestration”. Instead, we think about the kinds of words that you use all the time without even thinking about it, like “the”. You might not already know...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne on the science of language author
22.06.2018 http://i1.sndcdn.com/avatars-000283544519-wbxw6j-original.jpg

21: What words sound spiky across languages? Interview with Suzy Styles

Most of the time, a word is an arbitrary label: there’s no particular reason why a cat has to be associated with the particular string of sounds in the word “cat”, and indeed other languages have different words for the same animal. But sometimes it ma...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne on the science of language author
17.05.2018 http://i1.sndcdn.com/avatars-000283544519-wbxw6j-original.jpg

20: Speaking Canadian and Australian English in a British-American binary

Australian and Canadian English don’t sound much alike, but they have one big similarity: they’re both national varieties that tend to get overshadowed by their more famous siblings. In this episode of Lingthusiasm, your hosts Lauren Gawne and Gretch...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne on the science of language author
19.04.2018 http://i1.sndcdn.com/avatars-000283544519-wbxw6j-original.jpg

19: Sentences with baggage - Presuppositions

What’s so weird if I say, “the present King of France is bald” or “I need to pick up my pet unicorn from the vet”? It seems like those sentences should be false: at least, they certainly can’t be true. But if you reply, “No, he isn’t” or “No, you don’t...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne on the science of language author
15.03.2018 http://i1.sndcdn.com/avatars-000283544519-wbxw6j-original.jpg

18: Translating the untranslatable

Lists of ‘untranslatable’ words always come with... translations. So what do people really mean when they say a word is untranslatable? In this episode, your hosts Lauren Gawne and Gretchen McCulloch explore how how we translate different kinds of mea...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne on the science of language author
15.02.2018 http://i1.sndcdn.com/avatars-000283544519-wbxw6j-original.jpg

17: Vowel Gymnastics

Say, “aaaaaahhhh…..” Now try going smoothly from one vowel to another, without pausing: “aaaaaaaeeeeeeeiiiiiii”. Feel how your tongue moves in relation to the back of the roof of your mouth as you move from one vowel to the next. When you say “ahhhh” l...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne on the science of language author
18.01.2018 http://i1.sndcdn.com/avatars-000283544519-wbxw6j-original.jpg

16: Learning parts of words - Morphemes and the wug test

Here’s a strange little blue animal you’ve never seen before. It’s called a wug. Now here’s another one. There are two of them. There are two ___? You probably thought “wugs” – and even kids as young as 3 years old would agree with you. But how did y...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne on the science of language author
21.12.2017 http://i1.sndcdn.com/avatars-000283544519-wbxw6j-original.jpg

15: Talking and thinking about time

When we talk about things that languages have in common, we often talk about the physical side, the fact that languages are produced by human bodies, using the same brain and hands and vocal tract. But they’re also all produced (so far) by people from ...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne on the science of language author
17.11.2017

14: Getting into, up for, and down with prepositions

Are you up for some prepositions? You might think you’re over prepositions, but have you ever really looked into them, or have you just gone by them? Other parts of speech notwithstanding, prepositions are something we’re really down with. In Episode...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne on the science of language author
19.10.2017

13: What Does it Mean to Sound Black? Intonation and Identity Interview with Nicole Holliday

If you grow up with multiple accents to choose from, what does the one you choose say about your identity? How can linguistics unpick our hidden assumptions about what “sounds angry” or “sounds articulate”? What can we learn from studying the melodies ...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne on the science of language author
21.09.2017

12: Sounds you can’t hear - Babies, accents, and phonemes

Why does it always sound slightly off when someone tries to imitate your accent? Why do tiny children learning your second language already sound better than you, even though you’ve been learning it longer than they’ve been alive? What does it mean for...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne on the science of language author
17.08.2017

11: Layers of meaning - Cooperation, humour, and Gricean Maxims

– Would you like some coffee? – Coffee would keep me awake. Does that mean yes coffee, or no coffee? It depends! Is it the morning or the evening? Is the person trying to pull an all-nighter or take an afternoon nap? A computer looking strictly at t...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne on the science of language author
20.07.2017

10: Learning languages linguistically

Some linguists work with multiple languages, while others focus on just one. But for many people, learning a language after early childhood is the thing that first gets them curious about how language works in general and all the things in their native...
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne on the science of language author
15.06.2017

09: The bridge between words and sentences - Constituency

How do we get from knowing words to making brand-new sentences out of them? In episode 9 of Lingthusiasm, your hosts Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne talk about how words form groups with other words: constituency. Once you start looking for it, c...
Lingthusiasm author
18.05.2017

08: People who make dictionaries - Review of WORD BY WORD by Kory Stamper

Dictionaries: they’re made by real people! In episode 8 of Lingthusiasm, your hosts Lauren Gawne and Gretchen McCulloch talk about Word by Word, a recent book by Kory Stamper, a lexicographer at Merriam-Webster, about how dictionaries get made. (Spoi...
Lingthusiasm author
17.04.2017

07: Kids these days aren’t ruining language

There are some pretty funny quotes of historical people complaining about kids back then doing linguistic things that now seem totally unremarkable. So let’s cut to the chase and celebrate linguistic innovation while it’s happening. In episode 7 of L...
Lingthusiasm author
16.03.2017

06: All the sounds in all the languages - The International Phonetic Alphabet

English writing is hugely inconsistent: is “ough” pronounced as in cough, though, through, thought, rough, plough, or thorough? And once you start adding in other languages with different conventions and writing systems, things get even more complicate...
Lingthusiasm author
16.02.2017

05: Colour words around the world and inside your brain

Red, orange, yellow, grue, and purple? Not so fast – while many languages don’t distinguish between green and blue, it’s unlikely that a language would lump these two together while also having distinct words for “orange” and “purple”. But how do we ...
Lingthusiasm author
16.01.2017

04: Inside the Word of the Year vote

Every January, hundreds of linguists gather in a conference room somewhere in the US to discuss and vote for the Word of the Year. It’s the longest-running and most public WotY proceedings, and it’s part of the annual meeting of the American Dialect So...
Lingthusiasm author
12.12.2016

03: Arrival of the Linguists

Lingthusiasm Episode 3: Arrival of the linguists Linguists are very excited about the movie Arrival, because it stars a linguist saving the day by figuring out how to talk with aliens. Which, if you compare it to previous linguists in film (being obno...
Lingthusiasm author
12.12.2016

02: Pronouns. Little words, big jobs

If there are pronouns, why aren’t there connouns? What’s the point of these little words? In this episode of the podcast that’s enthusiastic about linguistics, your hosts Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne take a look at the many functions of pronou...
Lingthusiasm author
12.12.2016

01: Speaking a single language won’t bring about world peace

Wouldn’t it solve so many problems in the world if everyone just spoke the same language? Not so fast! Lingthusiasm is a brand-new podcast that’s enthusiastic about linguistics, hosted by Lauren Gawne of Superlinguo​ and Gretchen McCulloch of All Thi...
Lingthusiasm author