Science Magazine Podcast

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Website
http://www.sciencemag.org/
Description
Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.
Language
🇬🇧 English
last modified
2018-11-16 02:50
last episode published
2017-08-31 18:00
Contributors
Science Magazine author  
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Explicit
false
Number of Episodes
259
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Categories
Science & Medicine

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Episodes

Date Thumb Title & Description Contributors
15.11.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

The worst year ever and the effects of fasting

When was the worst year to be alive? Contributing Correspondent Ann Gibbons talks to host Sarah Crespi about a contender year that features a volcanic eruption, extended darkness, cold summer, and a plague. Also on this week’s show, host Meagan Cantwe...
Science author
8.11.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

A big increase in monkey research and an overhaul for the metric system

A new report suggests a big increase in the use of monkeys in laboratory experiments in the United States in 2017. Online News Editor David Grimm joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss which areas of research are experiencing this rise and the possible rea...
Science author
1.11.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

How the appendix could hold the keys to Parkinson’s disease, and materials scientists mimic nature

For a long time, Parkinson’s disease was thought to be merely a disorder of the nervous system. But in the past decade researchers have started to look elsewhere in the body for clues to this debilitating disease—particularly in the gut. Host Meagan Ca...
Science author
25.10.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Children sue the U.S. government over climate change, and how mice inherit their gut microbes

A group of children is suing the U.S. government—claiming their rights to life, liberty, and property are under threat from climate change thanks to government policies that have encouraged the use and extraction of fossil fuels. Host Meagan Cantwell i...
Science author
18.10.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Mutant cells in the esophagus, and protecting farmers from dangerous pesticide exposure

As you age, your cells divide over and over again, leading to minute changes in their genomes. New research reveals that in the lining of the esophagus, mutant cells run rampant, fighting for dominance over normal cells. But they do this without causin...
Science author
11.10.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

What we can learn from a cluster of people with an inherited intellectual disability, and questioning how sustainable green lawns are in dry places

A small isolated town in Colombia is home to a large cluster of people with fragile X syndrome—a genetic disorder that leads to intellectual disability, physical abnormalities, and sometimes autism. Spectrum staff reporter Hannah Furfaro joins host Sar...
Science author
4.10.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Odd new particles may be tunneling through the planet, and how the flu operates differently in big and small towns

Hoping to spot subatomic particles called neutrinos smashing into Earth, the balloon-borne Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) detector has circled the South Pole four times. ANITA has yet to detect those particles, but it has twice seen oddb...
Science author
27.09.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

The future of PCB-laden orca whales, and doing genomics work with Indigenous people

Science has often treated Indigenous people as resources for research—especially when it comes to genomics. Now, Indigenous people are exploring how this type of study can be conducted in a way that respects their people and traditions. Meagan Cantwell...
Science author
20.09.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Metaresearchers take on meta-analyses, and hoary old myths about science

Meta-analyses—structured analyses of many studies on the same topic—were once seen as objective and definitive projects that helped sort out conflicts amongst smaller studies. These days, thousands of meta-analyses are published every year—many either ...
Science author
13.09.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

The youngest sex chromosomes on the block, and how to test a Zika vaccine without Zika cases

Strawberries had both male and female parts, like most plants, until several million years ago. This may seem like a long time ago, but it actually means strawberries have some of the youngest sex chromosomes around. What are the advantages of splittin...
Science author
6.09.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Should we prioritize which endangered species to save, and why were chemists baffled by soot for so long?

We are in the middle of what some scientists are calling the sixth mass extinction and not all at-risk species can be saved. That’s causing some conservationists to say we need to start thinking about “species triage.” Meagan Cantwell interviews freela...
Science author
30.08.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

<i>Science</i> and <i>Nature</i> get their social science studies replicated—or not, the mechanisms behind human-induced earthquakes, and the taboo of claiming causality in science

A new project out of the Center for Open Science in Charlottesville, Virginia, found that of all the experimental social science papers published in Science and Nature from 2010–15, 62% successfully replicated, even when larger sample sizes were used. ...
Science author
23.08.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Sending flocks of tiny satellites out past Earth orbit and solving the irrigation efficiency paradox

Small satellites—about the size of a briefcase—have been hitching rides on rockets to lower Earth orbit for decades. Now, because of their low cost and ease of launching, governments and private companies are looking to expand the range of these “sate-...
Science author
16.08.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Ancient volcanic eruptions, and peer pressure—from robots

Several thousand years ago the volcano under Santorini in Greece—known as Thera—erupted in a tremendous explosion, dusting the nearby Mediterranean civilizations of Crete and Egypt in a layer of white ash. This geological marker could be used to tie to...
Science author
9.08.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Doubts about the drought that kicked off our latest geological age, and a faceoff between stink bugs with samurai wasps

We now live in the Meghalayan age—the last age of the Holocene epoch. Did you get the memo? A July decision by the International Commission on Stratigraphy, which is responsible for naming geological time periods, divided the Holocene into three ages: ...
Science author
2.08.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

How our brains may have evolved for language, and clues to what makes us leaders—or followers

Yes, humans are the only species with language, but how did we acquire it? New research suggests our linguistic prowess might arise from the same process that brought domesticated dogs big eyes and bonobos the power to read others’ intent. Online News ...
Science author
26.07.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Liquid water on Mars, athletic performance in transgender women, and the lost colony of Roanoke

Billions of years ago, Mars probably hosted many water features: streams, rivers, gullies, etc. But until recently, water detected on the Red Planet was either locked up in ice or flitting about as a gas in the atmosphere. Now, researchers analyzing ra...
Science author
19.07.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Why the platypus gave up suckling, and how gravity waves clear clouds

Suckling mothers milk is a pretty basic feature of being a mammal. Humans do it. Possums do it. But monotremes such as the platypus and echidna—although still mammals—gave up suckling long ago. Instead, they lap at milky patches on their mothers’ skin ...
Science author
12.07.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

The South Pole’s IceCube detector catches a ghostly particle from deep space, and how rice knows to grow when submerged

A detection of a single neutrino at the 1-square-kilometer IceCube detector in Antarctica may signal the beginning of “neutrino astronomy.” The neutral, almost massless particle left its trail of debris in the ice last September, and its source was pic...
Science author
5.07.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

A polio outbreak threatens global eradication plans, and what happened to America’s first dogs

Wild polio has been hunted to near extinction in a decades-old global eradication program. Now, a vaccine-derived outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is threatening to seriously extend the polio eradication endgame. Deputy News Edito...
Science author
28.06.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Increasing transparency in animal research to sway public opinion, and a reaching a plateau in human mortality

Public opinion on the morality of animal research is on the downswing in the United States. But some researchers think letting the public know more about how animals are used in experiments might turn things around. Online News Editor David Grimm joins...
Science author
21.06.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

New evidence in Cuba’s ‘sonic attacks,’ and finding an extinct gibbon—in a royal Chinese tomb

Since the 2016 reports of a mysterious assault on U.S. embassy staff in Cuba, researchers have struggled to find evidence of injury or weapon. Now, new research has discovered inner-ear damage in some of the personnel complaining of symptoms. Former In...
Science author
14.06.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

The places where HIV shows no sign of ending, and the parts of the human brain that are bigger—in bigger brains

Nigeria, Russia, and Florida seem like an odd set, but they all have one thing in common: growing caseloads of HIV. Science Staff Writer Jon Cohen joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about this week’s big read on how the fight against HIV/AIDS is evolving ...
Science author
7.06.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Science books for summer, and a blood test for predicting preterm birth

What book are you taking to the beach or the field this summer? Science’s books editor Valerie Thompson and host Sarah Crespi discuss a selection of science books that will have you catching comets and swimming with the fishes. Sarah also talks with M...
Science author
31.05.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

The first midsize black holes, and the environmental impact of global food production

Astronomers have been able to detect supermassive black holes and teeny-weeny black holes but the midsize ones have been elusive. Now, researchers have scanned through archives looking for middle-size galaxies and found traces of these missing middlers...
Science author
24.05.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Sketching suspects with DNA, and using light to find Zika-infected mosquitoes

DNA fingerprinting has been used to link people to crimes for decades, by matching DNA from a crime scene to DNA extracted from a suspect. Now, investigators are using other parts of the genome—such as markers for hair and eye color—to help rule people...
Science author
17.05.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Tracking ancient Rome’s rise using Greenland’s ice, and fighting fungicide resistance

Two thousand years ago, ancient Romans were pumping lead into the air as they smelted ores to make the silvery coin of the realm. Online news editor David Grimm talks to Sarah Crespi about how the pollution of ice in Greenland from this process provide...
Science author
10.05.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Ancient DNA is helping find the first horse tamers, and a single gene is spawning a fierce debate in salmon conservation

Who were the first horse tamers? Online News Editor Catherine Matacic talks to Sarah Crespi about a new study that brings genomics to bear on the question. The hunt for the original equine domesticators has focused on Bronze Age people living on the E...
Science author
3.05.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

The twins climbing Mount Everest for science, and the fractal nature of human bone

To study the biological differences brought on by space travel, NASA sent one twin into space and kept another on Earth in 2015. Now, researchers from that project are trying to replicate that work planet-side to see whether the differences in gene exp...
Science author
26.04.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Deciphering talking drums, and squeezing more juice out of solar panels

Researchers have found new clues to how the “talking drums” of one Amazonian tribe convey their messages. Sarah Crespi talks with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic about the role of tone and rhythm in this form of communication. Getting poked with ...
Science author
19.04.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Drug use in the ancient world, and what will happen to plants as carbon dioxide levels increase

Armed with new data, archaeologists are revealing that mind-altering drugs were present at the dawn of the first complex societies some 5000 years ago in the ancient Middle East. Contributing writer Andrew Lawler joins Sarah Crespi to discuss the evide...
Science author
12.04.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

How DNA is revealing Latin America’s lost histories, and how to make a molecule from just two atoms

Geneticists and anthropologists studying historical records and modern-day genomes are finding traces of previously unknown migrants to Latin America in the 16th and 17th centuries, when Asians, Africans, and Europeans first met indigenous Latin Americ...
Science author
5.04.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Legendary Viking crystals, and how to put an octopus to sleep

A millennium ago, Viking navigators may have used crystals known as “sunstones” to navigate between Norway and Greenland. Sarah Crespi talks with Online News Editor David Grimm about how one might use a crystal to figure out where they are. Sarah also...
Science author
29.03.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Chimpanzee retirement gains momentum, and x-ray ‘ghost images’ could cut radiation doses

Two of the world’s most famous research chimpanzees have finally retired. Hercules and Leo arrived at a chimp sanctuary in Georgia last week. Sarah Crespi checks in with Online News Editor David Grimm on the increasing momentum for research chimp retir...
Science author
22.03.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

A possible cause for severe morning sickness, and linking mouse moms’ caretaking to brain changes in baby mice

Researchers are converging on which genes are linked to morning sickness—the nausea and vomiting associated with pregnancy—and the more severe form: hyperemesis gravidarum (HG). And once we know what those genes are—can we help pregnant women feel bett...
Science author
15.03.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

How humans survived an ancient volcanic winter and how disgust shapes ecosystems

When Indonesia’s Mount Toba blew its top some 74,000 years ago, an apocalyptic scenario ensued: Tons of ash and debris entered the atmosphere, coating the planet in ash for 2 weeks straight and sending global temperatures plummeting. Despite the worldw...
Science author
8.03.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Animals that don’t need people to be domesticated; the astonishing spread of false news; and links between gender, sexual orientation, and speech

Did people domesticate animals? Or did they domesticate themselves? Online News Editor David Grimm talks with Sarah Crespi about a recent study that looked at self-domesticating mice. If they could go it alone, could cats or dogs have done the same in ...
Science author
1.03.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

A new dark matter signal from the early universe, massive family trees, and how we might respond to alien contact

For some time after the big bang there were no stars. Researchers are now looking at cosmic dawn—the time when stars first popped into being—and are seeing hints of dark matter’s influence on supercold hydrogen clouds. News Writer Adrian Cho talks with...
Science author
22.02.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Neandertals that made art, live news from the AAAS Annual Meeting, and the emotional experience of being a scientist

We talk about the techniques of painting sleuths, how to combat alternative facts or “fake news,” and using audio signposts to keep birds from flying into buildings. For this segment, David Grimm—online news editor for Science—talks with host Sarah Cre...
Science author
15.02.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Genes that turn off after death, and debunking the sugar conspiracy

Some of our genes come alive after we die. David Grimm—online news editor for Science—talks with Sarah Crespi about which genes are active after death and what we can learn about time of death by looking at patterns of postmortem gene expression. Sara...
Science author
8.02.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Happy lab animals may make better research subjects, and understanding the chemistry of the indoor environment

Would happy lab animals—rats, mice, even zebrafish—make for better experiments? David Grimm—online news editor for Science—talks with Sarah Crespi about the potential of treating lab animals more like us and making them more useful for science at the s...
Science author
1.02.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Following 1000 people for decades to learn about the interplay of health, environment, and temperament, and investigating why naked mole rats don’t seem to age

David Grimm—online news editor for Science—talks with Sarah Crespi about the chance a naked mole rat could die at any one moment. Surprisingly, the probability a naked mole rat will die does not go up as it gets older. Researchers are looking at the bi...
Science author
25.01.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

The dangers of dismantling a geoengineered sun shield and the importance of genes we don’t inherit

Catherine Matacic—online news editor for Science—talks with Sarah Crespi about how geoengineering could reduce the harshest impacts of climate change, but make them even worse if it were ever turned off. Sarah also interviews Augustine Kong of the Big...
Science author
18.01.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Unearthed letters reveal changes in Fields Medal awards, and predicting crime with computers is no easy feat

Freelance science writer Michael Price talks with Sarah Crespi about recently revealed deliberations for a coveted mathematics prize: the Fields Medal. Unearthed letters suggest early award committees favored promise and youth over star power. Sarah a...
Science author
11.01.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Salad-eating sharks, and what happens after quantum computing achieves quantum supremacy

David Grimm—online news editor for Science—talks with Sarah Crespi about two underwater finds: the first sharks shown to survive off of seagrass and what fossilized barnacles reveal about ancient whale migrations. Sarah also interviews Staff Writer Ad...
Science author
4.01.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Who visits raccoon latrines, and boosting cancer therapy with gut microbes

David Grimm—online news editor for Science—talks with Sarah Crespi about a long-term project monitoring raccoon latrines in California. What influence do these wild bathrooms have on the ecosystem? Sarah also interviews Christian Jobin of the Universi...
Science author
21.12.2017 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

<i>Science</i>’s Breakthrough of the Year, our best online news, and science books for your shopping list

Dave Grimm—online news editor for Science—talks with Sarah Crespi about a few of this year’s top stories from our online news site, like ones on a major error in the monarch butterfly biological record and using massive balloons to build tunnels, and w...
Science author
14.12.2017 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Putting the breaks on driverless cars, and dolphins that can muffle their ears

Whales and dolphins have incredibly sensitive hearing and are known to be harmed by loud underwater noises. David Grimm talks with Sarah Crespi about new research on captive cetaceans suggesting that some species can naturally muffle such sounds—perhap...
Science author
7.12.2017 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Folding DNA into teddy bears and getting creative about gun violence research

This week, three papers came out describing new approaches to folding DNA into large complex shapes—20 times bigger than previous DNA sculptures. Staff Writer Bob Service talks with Sarah Crespi about building microscopic teddy bears, doughnuts, and mo...
Science author
30.11.2017 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Debunking yeti DNA, and the incredibly strong arms of prehistoric female farmers

The abominable snowman, the yeti, bigfoot, and sasquatch—these long-lived myths of giant, hairy hominids depend on dropping elusive clues to stay in the popular imagination—a blurry photo here, a big footprint there—but what happens when scientists try...
Science author