Science Magazine Podcast

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Website
http://www.sciencemag.org/
Description
Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.
Language
🇬🇧 English
last modified
2019-03-22 21:50
last episode published
2019-03-21 14:45
publication frequency
7.1 days
Contributors
Science Magazine author  
Sciencepodcast owner  
Explicit
false
Number of Episodes
276
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Detail page
Categories
Science & Medicine

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Episodes

Date Thumb Title & Description Contributors
21.03.2019 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Vacuuming potato-size nodules of valuable metals in the deep sea, and an expedition to an asteroid 290 million kilometers away

Pirate’s gold may not be that far off, as there are valuable metals embedded in potato-size nodules thousands of meters down in the depths of the ocean. Host Meagan Cantwell talks with Staff Writer Paul Voosen about the first deep-sea test of a bus-siz...
Science author
14.03.2019 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Mysterious fast radio bursts and long-lasting effects of childhood cancer treatments

Host Sarah Crespi talks with Staff Writer Daniel Clery about the many, many theories surrounding fast radio bursts—extremely fast, intense radio signals from outside the galaxy—and a new telescope coming online that may help sort them out. Also this w...
Science author
7.03.2019 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Clues that the medieval plague swept into sub-Saharan Africa and evidence humans hunted and butchered giant ground sloths 12,000 years ago

New archaeological evidence suggests the same black plague that decimated Europe also took its toll on sub-Saharan Africa. Host Sarah Crespi talks with Contributing Correspondent Lizzie Wade about diverse medieval sub-Saharan cities that shrank or even...
Science author
28.02.2019 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Measuring earthquake damage with cellphone sensors and determining the height of the ancient Tibetan Plateau

In the wake of a devastating earthquake, assessing the extent of damage to infrastructure is time consuming—now, a cheap sensor system based on the accelerometers in cellphones could expedite this process. Host Sarah Crespi talks with Contributing Corr...
Science author
21.02.2019 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Spotting slavery from space, and using iPads for communication disorders

In our first segment from the annual meeting of AAAS (Science’s publisher) in Washington, D.C., host Sarah Crespi talks with Cathy Binger of University of New Mexico in Albuquerque about her session on the role of modern technology, such as iPads and a...
Science author
14.02.2019 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

How far out we can predict the weather, and an ocean robot that monitors food webs

The app on your phone tells you the weather for the next 10 days—that’s the furthest forecasters have ever been able to predict. In fact, every decade for the past hundred years, a day has been added to the total forecast length. But we may be approach...
Science author
7.02.2019 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Possible potato improvements, and a pill that gives you a jab in the gut

Because of its genetic complexity, the potato didn’t undergo a “green revolution” like other staple crops. It can take more than 15 years to breed a new kind of potato that farmers can grow, and genetic engineering just won’t work for tackling complex ...
Science author
31.01.2019 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Treating the microbiome, and a gene that induces sleep

Orla Smith, editor of Science Translational Medicine joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about what has changed in the past 10 years of microbiome research, what’s getting close to being useful in treatment, and how strong, exactly, the research is behind ...
Science author
24.01.2019 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Pollution from pot plants, and how our bodies perceive processed foods

The “dank” smelling terpenes emitted by growing marijuana can combine with chemicals in car emissions to form ozone, a health-damaging compound. This is especially problematic in Denver, where ozone levels are dangerously high and pot farms have sprung...
Science author
17.01.2019 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Peering inside giant planets, and fighting Ebola in the face of fake news

It’s incredibly difficult to get an inkling of what is going on inside gas giants Saturn and Jupiter. But with data deliveries from the Cassini and Juno spacecraft, researchers are starting to learn more. Science Staff Writer Paul Voosen talks with hos...
Science author
10.01.2019 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

A mysterious blue pigment in the teeth of a medieval woman, and the evolution of online master’s degrees

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) provide free lectures and assignments, and gained global attention for their potential to increase education accessibility. Plagued with high attrition rates and fewer returning students every year, MOOCs have pivote...
Science author
3.01.2019 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Will a radical open-access proposal catch on, and quantifying the most deadly period of the Holocaust

Plan S, an initiative that requires participating research funders to immediately publish research in an open-access journal or repository, was announced in September 2018 by Science Europe with 11 participating agencies. Several others have signed on ...
Science author
20.12.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

End of the year podcast: 2018’s breakthroughs, breakdowns, and top online stories

First, we hear Online News Editor David Grimm and host Sarah Crespi discuss audience favorites and staff picks from this year’s online stories, from mysterious pelvises to quantum engines. Megan Cantwell talks with News Editor Tim Appenzeller about th...
Science author
13.12.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

‘The Tragedy of the Commons’ turns 50, and how Neanderthal DNA could change your skull

In 1968, Science published the now-famous paper “The Tragedy of the Commons” by ecologist Garrett Hardin. In it, Hardin questioned society’s ability to manage shared resources, concluding that individuals will act in their self-interest and ultimately ...
Science author
6.12.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Where private research funders stow their cash and studying gun deaths in children

A new Science investigation reveals several major private research funders—including the Wellcome Trust and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation—are making secretive offshore investments at odds with their organizational missions. Host Meagan Cantwell ta...
Science author
29.11.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

The universe’s star formation history and a powerful new helper for evolution

In a fast-changing environment, evolution can be slow—sometimes so slow that an organism dies out before the right mutation comes along. Host Sarah Crespi speaks with Staff Writer Elizabeth Pennisi about how plastic traits—traits that can alter in resp...
Science author
22.11.2018

Exploding the Cambrian and building a DNA database for forensics

First, we hear from science writer Joshua Sokol about his trip to the Cambrian—well not quite. He talks with host Megan Cantwell about his travels to a remote site in the mountains of British Columbia where some of Earth’s first animals—including a mys...
Science author
15.11.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

The worst year ever and the effects of fasting

When was the worst year to be alive? Contributing Correspondent Ann Gibbons talks to host Sarah Crespi about a contender year that features a volcanic eruption, extended darkness, cold summer, and a plague. Also on this week’s show, host Meagan Cantwe...
Science author
8.11.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

A big increase in monkey research and an overhaul for the metric system

A new report suggests a big increase in the use of monkeys in laboratory experiments in the United States in 2017. Online News Editor David Grimm joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss which areas of research are experiencing this rise and the possible rea...
Science author
1.11.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

How the appendix could hold the keys to Parkinson’s disease, and materials scientists mimic nature

For a long time, Parkinson’s disease was thought to be merely a disorder of the nervous system. But in the past decade researchers have started to look elsewhere in the body for clues to this debilitating disease—particularly in the gut. Host Meagan Ca...
Science author
25.10.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Children sue the U.S. government over climate change, and how mice inherit their gut microbes

A group of children is suing the U.S. government—claiming their rights to life, liberty, and property are under threat from climate change thanks to government policies that have encouraged the use and extraction of fossil fuels. Host Meagan Cantwell i...
Science author
18.10.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Mutant cells in the esophagus, and protecting farmers from dangerous pesticide exposure

As you age, your cells divide over and over again, leading to minute changes in their genomes. New research reveals that in the lining of the esophagus, mutant cells run rampant, fighting for dominance over normal cells. But they do this without causin...
Science author
11.10.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

What we can learn from a cluster of people with an inherited intellectual disability, and questioning how sustainable green lawns are in dry places

A small isolated town in Colombia is home to a large cluster of people with fragile X syndrome—a genetic disorder that leads to intellectual disability, physical abnormalities, and sometimes autism. Spectrum staff reporter Hannah Furfaro joins host Sar...
Science author
4.10.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Odd new particles may be tunneling through the planet, and how the flu operates differently in big and small towns

Hoping to spot subatomic particles called neutrinos smashing into Earth, the balloon-borne Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) detector has circled the South Pole four times. ANITA has yet to detect those particles, but it has twice seen oddb...
Science author
27.09.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

The future of PCB-laden orca whales, and doing genomics work with Indigenous people

Science has often treated Indigenous people as resources for research—especially when it comes to genomics. Now, Indigenous people are exploring how this type of study can be conducted in a way that respects their people and traditions. Meagan Cantwell...
Science author
20.09.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Metaresearchers take on meta-analyses, and hoary old myths about science

Meta-analyses—structured analyses of many studies on the same topic—were once seen as objective and definitive projects that helped sort out conflicts amongst smaller studies. These days, thousands of meta-analyses are published every year—many either ...
Science author
13.09.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

The youngest sex chromosomes on the block, and how to test a Zika vaccine without Zika cases

Strawberries had both male and female parts, like most plants, until several million years ago. This may seem like a long time ago, but it actually means strawberries have some of the youngest sex chromosomes around. What are the advantages of splittin...
Science author
6.09.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Should we prioritize which endangered species to save, and why were chemists baffled by soot for so long?

We are in the middle of what some scientists are calling the sixth mass extinction and not all at-risk species can be saved. That’s causing some conservationists to say we need to start thinking about “species triage.” Meagan Cantwell interviews freela...
Science author
30.08.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

<i>Science</i> and <i>Nature</i> get their social science studies replicated—or not, the mechanisms behind human-induced earthquakes, and the taboo of claiming causality in science

A new project out of the Center for Open Science in Charlottesville, Virginia, found that of all the experimental social science papers published in Science and Nature from 2010–15, 62% successfully replicated, even when larger sample sizes were used. ...
Science author
23.08.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Sending flocks of tiny satellites out past Earth orbit and solving the irrigation efficiency paradox

Small satellites—about the size of a briefcase—have been hitching rides on rockets to lower Earth orbit for decades. Now, because of their low cost and ease of launching, governments and private companies are looking to expand the range of these “sate-...
Science author
16.08.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Ancient volcanic eruptions, and peer pressure—from robots

Several thousand years ago the volcano under Santorini in Greece—known as Thera—erupted in a tremendous explosion, dusting the nearby Mediterranean civilizations of Crete and Egypt in a layer of white ash. This geological marker could be used to tie to...
Science author
9.08.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Doubts about the drought that kicked off our latest geological age, and a faceoff between stink bugs with samurai wasps

We now live in the Meghalayan age—the last age of the Holocene epoch. Did you get the memo? A July decision by the International Commission on Stratigraphy, which is responsible for naming geological time periods, divided the Holocene into three ages: ...
Science author
2.08.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

How our brains may have evolved for language, and clues to what makes us leaders—or followers

Yes, humans are the only species with language, but how did we acquire it? New research suggests our linguistic prowess might arise from the same process that brought domesticated dogs big eyes and bonobos the power to read others’ intent. Online News ...
Science author
26.07.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Liquid water on Mars, athletic performance in transgender women, and the lost colony of Roanoke

Billions of years ago, Mars probably hosted many water features: streams, rivers, gullies, etc. But until recently, water detected on the Red Planet was either locked up in ice or flitting about as a gas in the atmosphere. Now, researchers analyzing ra...
Science author
19.07.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Why the platypus gave up suckling, and how gravity waves clear clouds

Suckling mothers milk is a pretty basic feature of being a mammal. Humans do it. Possums do it. But monotremes such as the platypus and echidna—although still mammals—gave up suckling long ago. Instead, they lap at milky patches on their mothers’ skin ...
Science author
12.07.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

The South Pole’s IceCube detector catches a ghostly particle from deep space, and how rice knows to grow when submerged

A detection of a single neutrino at the 1-square-kilometer IceCube detector in Antarctica may signal the beginning of “neutrino astronomy.” The neutral, almost massless particle left its trail of debris in the ice last September, and its source was pic...
Science author
5.07.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

A polio outbreak threatens global eradication plans, and what happened to America’s first dogs

Wild polio has been hunted to near extinction in a decades-old global eradication program. Now, a vaccine-derived outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is threatening to seriously extend the polio eradication endgame. Deputy News Edito...
Science author
28.06.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Increasing transparency in animal research to sway public opinion, and a reaching a plateau in human mortality

Public opinion on the morality of animal research is on the downswing in the United States. But some researchers think letting the public know more about how animals are used in experiments might turn things around. Online News Editor David Grimm joins...
Science author
21.06.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

New evidence in Cuba’s ‘sonic attacks,’ and finding an extinct gibbon—in a royal Chinese tomb

Since the 2016 reports of a mysterious assault on U.S. embassy staff in Cuba, researchers have struggled to find evidence of injury or weapon. Now, new research has discovered inner-ear damage in some of the personnel complaining of symptoms. Former In...
Science author
14.06.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

The places where HIV shows no sign of ending, and the parts of the human brain that are bigger—in bigger brains

Nigeria, Russia, and Florida seem like an odd set, but they all have one thing in common: growing caseloads of HIV. Science Staff Writer Jon Cohen joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about this week’s big read on how the fight against HIV/AIDS is evolving ...
Science author
7.06.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Science books for summer, and a blood test for predicting preterm birth

What book are you taking to the beach or the field this summer? Science’s books editor Valerie Thompson and host Sarah Crespi discuss a selection of science books that will have you catching comets and swimming with the fishes. Sarah also talks with M...
Science author
31.05.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

The first midsize black holes, and the environmental impact of global food production

Astronomers have been able to detect supermassive black holes and teeny-weeny black holes but the midsize ones have been elusive. Now, researchers have scanned through archives looking for middle-size galaxies and found traces of these missing middlers...
Science author
24.05.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Sketching suspects with DNA, and using light to find Zika-infected mosquitoes

DNA fingerprinting has been used to link people to crimes for decades, by matching DNA from a crime scene to DNA extracted from a suspect. Now, investigators are using other parts of the genome—such as markers for hair and eye color—to help rule people...
Science author
17.05.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Tracking ancient Rome’s rise using Greenland’s ice, and fighting fungicide resistance

Two thousand years ago, ancient Romans were pumping lead into the air as they smelted ores to make the silvery coin of the realm. Online news editor David Grimm talks to Sarah Crespi about how the pollution of ice in Greenland from this process provide...
Science author
10.05.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Ancient DNA is helping find the first horse tamers, and a single gene is spawning a fierce debate in salmon conservation

Who were the first horse tamers? Online News Editor Catherine Matacic talks to Sarah Crespi about a new study that brings genomics to bear on the question. The hunt for the original equine domesticators has focused on Bronze Age people living on the E...
Science author
3.05.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

The twins climbing Mount Everest for science, and the fractal nature of human bone

To study the biological differences brought on by space travel, NASA sent one twin into space and kept another on Earth in 2015. Now, researchers from that project are trying to replicate that work planet-side to see whether the differences in gene exp...
Science author
26.04.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Deciphering talking drums, and squeezing more juice out of solar panels

Researchers have found new clues to how the “talking drums” of one Amazonian tribe convey their messages. Sarah Crespi talks with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic about the role of tone and rhythm in this form of communication. Getting poked with ...
Science author
19.04.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Drug use in the ancient world, and what will happen to plants as carbon dioxide levels increase

Armed with new data, archaeologists are revealing that mind-altering drugs were present at the dawn of the first complex societies some 5000 years ago in the ancient Middle East. Contributing writer Andrew Lawler joins Sarah Crespi to discuss the evide...
Science author
12.04.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

How DNA is revealing Latin America’s lost histories, and how to make a molecule from just two atoms

Geneticists and anthropologists studying historical records and modern-day genomes are finding traces of previously unknown migrants to Latin America in the 16th and 17th centuries, when Asians, Africans, and Europeans first met indigenous Latin Americ...
Science author
5.04.2018 http://sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/science1400.png

Legendary Viking crystals, and how to put an octopus to sleep

A millennium ago, Viking navigators may have used crystals known as “sunstones” to navigate between Norway and Greenland. Sarah Crespi talks with Online News Editor David Grimm about how one might use a crystal to figure out where they are. Sarah also...
Science author