Southern Appalachian Creature Feature

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The Southern Appalachian Creature Feature provides a glimpse into the fascinating world of plants and animals in the Southern Appalachians, one of the most biologically diverse temperate regions in the world. Beyond that it also examines the pressing conservation issues of the region that affect those plants and animals - from invasive species, to growth management, to engaging people in the ourdooors. The program is presented through a partnership between the Asheville Field Office of the U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service and WNCW, 88.7, at Isothermal Community College in Spindale, North Carolina.

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Website
http://www.fws.gov/asheville/htmls/generalinfo/podcasts.html
Description
The Southern Appalachian Creature Feature provides a glimpse into the fascinating world of plants and animals in the Southern Appalachians, one of the most biologically diverse temperate regions in the world. Beyond that it also examines the pressing conservation issues of the region that affect those plants and animals - from invasive species, to growth management, to engaging people in the ourdooors. The program is presented through a partnership between the Asheville Field Office of the U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service and WNCW, 88.7, at Isothermal Community College in Spindale, North Carolina.
Language
🇬🇧 English
last modified
2008-09-22 21:18
last episode published
2016-03-07 18:16
publication frequency
9.79 days
Contributors
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author  
Gary Peeples owner  
Explicit
false
Number of Episodes
279
Rss-Feeds
Detail page
Categories
Science & Medicine Natural Sciences

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Episodes

Date Thumb Title & Description Contributors
7.03.2016

Cherokee education project

White oak, ramps, dogwood. All these are plants important to the Cherokee tradition, and the Forest Service has teamed with the Cherokee to expand scientific and cultural understanding of these plants and more on the part of Cherokee students.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service author
1.03.2016

Tennessee Cougars

No animal seems to get people as excited as cougars.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
22.02.2016

Wildlife Resources Commission Introduces New Turn-In-Poachers Program

Poaching isn’t just about the illegal harvest of elephant tusks and rhino horns – it can be a serious issue here in the southern Appalachians, impacting game animals, hurting the chances of recovering endangered species, and affecting our ability to co...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
15.02.2016

Snake fungal disease

Many people have heard about white-nose syndrome, the fungal disease responsible for killing more than a million bats in the eastern United States that has left biologists, researchers, and land managers scrambling to halt its spread and reverse the da...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
8.02.2016

Turkey seminars

The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission and the National Wild Turkey Federation are offering free turkey hunting seminars across North Carolina in March and April in anticipation of the spring turkey season
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
1.02.2016

Didymo

Researchers recently found a nuisance algae in Jackson County’s Tuckasegee River, prompting calls for anglers to be especially diligent when cleaning fishing equipment.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
25.01.2016

Sicklefin redhorse

Power companies, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, and state and federal agencies have come together to conserve the sicklefin redhorse, a fish found in only six Appalachian counties worldwide and being considered for the federal endangered species...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
18.01.2016

Income tax check for wildlife

Tax time approaches, and in North Carolina this provides an easy opportunity to support wildlife conservation.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
11.01.2016

Land and Water Conservation Fund

Over 50 years ago, Congress created the Land and Water Conservation Fund, a program that uses revenues from offshore oil and gas drilling in public waters to purchase land and easements for conservation and public recreation. The program has supported...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
4.01.2016

Forest Loss

According to U.S. Forest Service researchers and their partners, between 2000 and 2012 the world lost 660,000 square miles of forest, an area more than twice the size of Texas.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
28.12.2015

American eels in the mountains of Virginia

All American eels hatch from eggs in the Sargasso Sea, an area of the Atlantic Ocean east of the Bahamas and south of Bermuda. From there, the young eels head west, swimming up streams from Canada to South America, where they spend most of their lives,...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
21.12.2015

In the wake of hemlock woolly adelgid

Hemlock woolly adeglid, a tiny Asian insect, has killed hemlock trees across the southern Appalachians, opening up the forest canopy to additional sunlight.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
14.12.2015

National Wildlife Refuges

Head outdoors and enjoy some of the country’s most magical places — America’s National Wildlife Refuges offer unparalleled opportunities to experience the great outdoors and see a rich diversity of wildlife in beautiful natural settings. If that wasn’t...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
7.12.2015

Duck Season

In the United States, the vast majority of wildlife management is done by state wildlife agencies – the same folks who issue your hunting and fishing licenses. But there are some areas where the federal government steps in and takes a larger role. Duc...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
30.11.2015

Red spruce restoration

A recent afternoon found staff from the Fish and Wildlife Service and Southern Highlands Reserve bushwhacking through Pisgah National Forest collecting red spruce cones - a first step in a multi-year process to restore red spruce to areas where it was ...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
23.11.2015

Lake sturgeon return to North Carolina

Absent for more than half a century, lake sturgeon returned to North Carolina waters this fall as seven-thousand fish were released into the French Broad River.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
16.11.2015

Trout at Hanging Rock State Park

The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, along with North Carolina State Parks, continue to stock trout into in Hanging Rock State Park’s lake, supporting the new Stokes County trout fishery created earlier this year.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
9.11.2015

Bat monitoring

Monitoring, or regularly going out and counting plants or animals following an established protocol, provides biologists with key information on the distribution of plants and animals and the well-being of individual populations.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
2.11.2015

Little Tennessee River Basin Recognized for Native Fish Conservation

Recognizing its incredible diversity of stream life and years of efforts to conserve that diversity, the Little Tennessee River basin has been designated the nation’s first Native Fish Conservation Area.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
26.10.2015

Fourth-grade students hit the parks

Great Smoky Mountains National Park invites all 4th-grade students to visit the park as part of the White House's new Every Kid in a Park program. The park offers a variety of activities that fourth graders and their family can enjoy, including guided ...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
12.10.2015

Benefits of Prescribed Fire

The ridge we hiked along in Pisgah National Forest was open, dry, and on this day, hot. The area had recently experienced a fire and one of the benefits was the explosion of mountain golden heather, a threatened plant adapted to periodic fire.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
5.10.2015

Wild Hogs in Tennessee

Southern Appalachian Mountain bogs are one of the rarest habitats in the nation, and on my way to visit a North Georgia bog, our guides stopped to check a hog trap – designed to catch the hogs that were rooting in the bog, and damaging some of its rare...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
28.09.2015

Smokies Bat Closure

Great Smoky Mountains National Park officials announced the closure of the Whiteoak Sink area effective now through March 31, 2016 to limit human disturbance to bat hibernation sites and help hikers avoid interactions with bats.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
21.09.2015

Emerald Ash Borer Control

On a recent camping trip to Great Smoky Mountains National Park, it bore remembering that the park only allows outside firewood that is certified as being heated to the point that undesirable insects hitching a ride on the wood would be killed.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
14.09.2015

Cold Water Species and Climate Change

New research on the effects of warming temperatures and stream acidity projects average habitat losses of around 10 percent for coldwater aquatic species in southern Appalachian national forests – including up to a 20 percent loss of habitat in the Pis...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
7.09.2015

Whirling Disease in North Carolina Trout

Whirling disease, a parasitic disease affecting trout and salmon, has been found in North Carolina.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
31.08.2015

Butterfly Trail

Staff at the Asheville-based non-profit Monarch Rescue recently reported that monarch butterfly eggs and caterpillars were found at a pollinator garden they worked with students to install at Yancey County’s Mountain Heritage High School.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
24.08.2015

North Carolina Gets Grant for Bog Conservation

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently announced 37.2 million dollars in grants to 20 states to support the conservation of threatened and endangered species across the nation, and a portion of that money is coming to the southern Appalachians.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
17.08.2015

Gill Lice in North Carolina Trout

Fresh off of discovering whirling disease for the first time in North Carolina, fisheries biologists with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission recently confirmed gill lice on rainbow trout in three North Carolina streams.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
10.08.2015

Blue Ridge Parkway Bio-Blitz

The Blue Ridge Parkway, the National Park Service unit that stretches from Great Smoky Mountains National Park, along the Blue Ridge Mountains, to Virginia’s Shenandoah National Park, is hosting a bio-blitz in mid-September.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
3.08.2015

Stream Snorkeling

We’re in the heat of summer, and one thing is evident – river recreation is on the uptick this year. Why not add a new dimension to hitting the water?
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
27.07.2015

North Carolina’s Outdoor Heritage Act Signed into Law

North Carolina governor Pat McCrory recently signed into law the Outdoor Heritage Act.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
20.07.2015

Mountain Golden Heather Monitoring

Despite the elevation, it was quite hot, as the midday sun fell on the dry ridge running along Linville Gorge. We were there to monitor mountain golden heather, a threatened plant. Despite being a Wednesday, an off day for outdoor recreation, during th...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
13.07.2015

2015 Duck Stamp

The 2015-2016 Federal Duck Stamp was recently unveiled, and features a pair of ruddy ducks painted by wildlife artist Jennifer Miller of Olean, New York. Last fall, a panel of five judges chose Miller’s art from among 186 entries at the Federal Duck S...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
15.06.2015

Living with Bears

Bears have been in the news a lot recently, most notably related to a hiker who was pulled from his hammock by a bear in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. According to the Park Service’s report, the young man, and his father, who were travelling tog...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
8.06.2015

Tennessee Supports Monarchs

On the heels of numerous pollinator gardens being installed in western North Carolina, the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency has announced a major effort to help save monarch butterflies.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
1.06.2015

Bog turtles and poaching

I’ve often talked about southern Appalachian Mountain bogs, their rarity, and the rareness of many of the plants and animals found in them. There’s a bog south of Asheville that’s a bittersweet place. Despite development in its vicinity, it still hangs...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
18.05.2015

Northern Long-eared Bat on the Endangered Species List

On May fourth, the northern long-eared bat was added to the federal endangered species list as a threatened animal. What makes this listing especially notable, is it’s the first related to the fungal disease white-nose syndrome, which has killed millio...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
11.05.2015

Planting Gardens for Monarch Butterflies

In the wake of dramatically declining populations, last year the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was asked to place the monarch butterfly on the endangered species list, beginning a process of reviewing data and scientific literature to determine if lis...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
4.05.2015

Mountain Bogs National Wildlife Refuge Established

This past spring Mountain Bogs National Wildlife Refuge became America’s 563rd refuge.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
9.03.2015

Turkey Hunting Seminars

The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission and the National Wild Turkey Federation are offering free turkey hunting seminars in Henderson County’s Mills River community on April 1st and 2nd in anticipation of the upcoming spring turkey season.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
23.02.2015

Milkweed for Monarchs

The monarch is probably America’s best known butterfly, and the subject of extensive conservation efforts as it has experienced a dramatic decline in recent years, to the point the Fish and Wildlife Service has been asked to place it on the endangered ...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
16.02.2015

Monarch Conservation Initiative

While monarch butterflies are found across the United States — as recently as 1996 numbering some 1 billion — their numbers have declined by approximately 90 percent in recent years, a result of numerous threats.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
9.02.2015

Bald Eagle Shooting

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are investigating the shooting of an bald eagle in east Tennessee. A reward of up to $10,000 is being offered for information leading to a conviction of the person or perso...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
2.02.2015

Bog Turtle

It’s a cold day, with snow falling, as a group of biologists hikes across a southern Appalachian bog. Biologist Sue Cameron has found a hole in the ground that looks promising. Standing in the mud, she rolls up her sleeve, gets down on her knees, and s...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
19.01.2015

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Control in Sandy Mushd]

As part of the ongoing effort to combat the hemlock woolly adelgid in the Southern Appalachians, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission recently released predator beetles into Buncombe County’s Sandy Mush Game Lands.
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
12.01.2015

Great Smoky Mountains Visitor Numbers

For the fourth time in 80 years, Great Smoky Mountains National Park had over ten million annual visitors in a single year. In 2014, 10,099,275 visitors visited the park, an 8% increase over 2013. The other years when visitation topped ten million were...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
5.01.2015

Smokies Firewood Rules Goes into Effect

I’ve previously spoke about a proposal by Great Smoky Mountains National Park to limit the spread of invasive insects into the park by limiting the type of firewood that could be brought into the park, and come March 2015, those news rules will go into...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
29.12.2014

Sicklefin Redhorse

Every seat in the conference room was filled, with more chairs brought in for the overflow. In the room were aquatic biologists, geneticists, fish propagation experts, dam management experts – a host of biologists offering what they knew about the sick...
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author
15.12.2014

Hiking Challenges

It’s a new year, full of promise and opportunity. It’s the annual clean slate, when we look ahead, full of thoughts about how to enrich our minds and bodies, and generally become better people
U.S. Fish& Wildlife Service author