SILLIAC: The Podcast

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In 1956, SILLIAC — the first Australian-built computer built within an Australian University — was switched on for the first time. In 2006, the University of Sydney celebrated SILLIAC’s 50th birthday with a two-day celebration event, and interviewed key players from those early days of Australian computing.

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Website
http://www.physics.usyd.edu.au/foundation/silliac/movie/podcast/podcast.html
Description
The University of Sydney celebrates the 50th anniversary of SILLIAC, the first computer built within an Australian university.
Language
last modified
2017-11-29 23:12
last episode published
2006-10-26 01:43
publication frequency
0.0 days
Contributors
Science Foundation for Physics, University of Sydney author  
Science Foundation for Physics owner  
Explicit
false
Number of Episodes
4
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Episodes

Date Thumb Title & Description Contributors
26.10.2006

SILLIACpodcast4

Part 4: End of an EraRunning 24-7, SILLIAC was certainly in demand in the late 50s and well into the 60s — between novel computing applications and a widespread training program, SILLIAC was a spring
Science Foundation for Physics, University of Sydney author
26.10.2006

SILLIACpodcast3

Part 3: Up and RunningCompleted ahead of schedule, SILLIAC was shown off to the public at the University’s Open Day in July 1956, playing tunes and challenging visitors to naughts-and-crosses. Then i
Science Foundation for Physics, University of Sydney author
26.10.2006

SILLIACpodcast2

Part 2: Building the TeamTo build such a complex machine — and to tune and tame its 300 valves to keep it running —Messel needed a crack team of engineers. Swires, de Ferranti, Bennet, Blatt, Aplin a
Science Foundation for Physics, University of Sydney author
26.10.2006

SILLIACpodcast1

Part 1: Getting StartedAdam Spencer introduces the story of SILLIAC, and traces its origins back more than 50 years to the School of Physics’ ties with the University of Illinois and their computer,
Science Foundation for Physics, University of Sydney author