Chemistry in its element

A weekly tour of the periodic table, from Chemistry World, the magazine of the Royal Society of Chemistry.

0 Likes     0 Followers     1 Subscribers

Sign up / Log in to like, follow, recommend and subscribe!

Website
http://www.chemistryworld.com/podcasts
Description
A weekly tour of the periodic table, from Chemistry World, the magazine of the Royal Society of Chemistry.
Language
🇬🇧 English
last modified
2019-06-22 10:50
last episode published
2019-06-21 13:42
publication frequency
7.38 days
Contributors
Chemistry World author  
Ben Valsler owner  
Explicit
false
Number of Episodes
554
Rss-Feeds
Detail page
Categories
Society & Culture Science & Medicine Natural Sciences History

Recommendations


Episodes

Date Thumb Title & Description Contributors
21.06.2019

Azidothymidine

The first drug approved in the US to treat Aids required a completely new approach to clinical trials – Frances Addison explores the history of azidothymidine
Chemistry World author
14.06.2019

Silver iodide

How the compound that ushered in a photographic revolution has taken to the skies to try to control the weather
Chemistry World author
7.06.2019

Amantadine

Katrina Krämer investigates how one of the smallest small-molecule drugs around saved Jeanna Giese's life
Chemistry World author
31.05.2019

Indole

Kat Arney investigates a potent chemical that might explain the brain-bending powers of bacteria
Chemistry World author
24.05.2019

Amber

Mike Freemantle introduces amber – the valuable organic gemstone that invests unwary insects in a durable tomb
Chemistry World author
17.05.2019

Beryllium oxide

Brian Clegg examines the duality that makes beryllium oxide so valuable to the electronics industry
Chemistry World author
10.05.2019

Methylphenidate (Ritalin)

Jamie Durrani diverts his attention to the rise of Ritalin, a drug first identified as a way of improving tennis performance
Chemistry World author
3.05.2019

Limulus Amebocyte Lysate

Frances Addison takes a look at the discovery that brought horseshoe crabs to the heart of the pharmaceutical industry
Chemistry World author
26.04.2019

Levothyroxine

Kit Chapman investigates the drug that has been one of the top five prescription medications in the UK every year for the last two decades
Chemistry World author
19.04.2019

Starch

Inspired by a mention of arrowroot in Jane Austen's Emma, Mike Freemantle investigates how subtle differences in composition mean starch can be resistant dietary fibre or easily-digested nourishment.
Chemistry World author
12.04.2019

Aniline

How an early synthetic dye chemical came to play a role in a mysterious disease outbreak in 1980s Spain
Chemistry World author
5.04.2019

Talc, or magnesium silicate

Coating your naked body with powdered magnesium silicate may sound strange, but it's an important part of many bathtime rituals
Chemistry World author
29.03.2019

Tocopherols and tocotrienols: vitamin E

Mike Freemantle discovers sea buckthorns, also called 'beauty berries' because of their high concentration of tocopherols and tocotrienols, collectively known as vitamin E.
Chemistry World author
22.03.2019

Trichloroanisole – Wine cork taint

If you've ever been unlucky enough to experience 'corked' wine, then 2,4,6-trichloroanisole, or TCA was likely the chemical culprit
Chemistry World author
15.03.2019

Vinblastine and vincristine – Vinca alkaloids

Kat Arney unearths the story of a truly international effort to develop new drugs for cancer, and the female researcher whose key role went overlooked
Chemistry World author
8.03.2019

Polyethylene glycol or PEG

Kit Chapman on the simple polymer that preserves and protects ancient artifacts, and saved a historical Swedish shipwreck from complete collapse
Chemistry World author
1.03.2019

Ferrous sulfate, or iron(II) sulfate

Mike Freemantle on the iron compound that has been turning oak gall extract into indelible ink for centuries, but is now eating though our ancient manuscripts and musical scores
Chemistry World author
22.02.2019

Nitrogenase

The mysterious enzyme that can beat the world’s biggest chemical process when it comes to breaking the dinitrogen triple bond
Chemistry World author
15.02.2019

Lazurite

A brilliant rich blue rock, prized in antiquity as a gemstone and a prominent pigment, lazurite is the basis of lapis lazuli, the original ultramarine paint and – as Brian Clegg finds – it even adorns Tutankhamun's death mask.
Chemistry World author
8.02.2019

Melarsoprol

Cases of sleeping sickness – human African trypanosomiasis – are in decline, dropping 86% in Africa between 2000 and 2014. Gege Li explores the role that this toxic, arsenic-based medication has to play.
Chemistry World author
1.02.2019

Omega-3 fatty acids

Many consume cod liver oil due to 'a vague sense we should be taking them for something' – but what to the omega-3 fatty acids actually do?
Chemistry World author
25.01.2019

Cacodyl

It made Robert Bunsen seriously ill, Michael Faraday thought it 'barbaric' to use in battle and even Fritz Haber – the 'father of chemical warfare' – abandoned it after a fatal accident in his lab. This week, Mike Freemantle tells the story of tetramet...
Chemistry World author
18.01.2019

Bronze

Kit Chapman takes us back to the 1904 Olympics in St Louis, via the bronze age and ancient Greece
Chemistry World author
11.01.2019

Ellagic acid

Louise Crane introduces the antioxidant that led to exaggerated claims that 'whisky helps fight cancer'
Chemistry World author
17.12.2018

Myristicin

The spice that gives your Christmas eggnog its distinctive taste and aroma is also a toxic narcotic that played an important role in international history. Florence Schechter shares the history of myristicin – the active ingredient in nutmeg
Chemistry World author
7.12.2018

Low-background steel

Post-nuclear steel is a little bit radioactive, so for some specialist jobs we need to find a source of steel from before the bomb
Chemistry World author
30.11.2018

Tin chlorides

The compounds that put the 'tin' in tin cans and help you to reflect on your appearance
Chemistry World author
23.11.2018

Propanethial-S-oxide: how onions make you cry

Kat Arney’s investigation of the pungent chemical in onions is enough to bring tears to your eyes
Chemistry World author
16.11.2018

Epoxies

Epoxies – including hard-wearing resins and strong adhesives – can be found almost everywhere, from your household white goods to the Large Hadron Collider. And the aroma of these compounds cemented their place in Brian Clegg's childhood memories.
Chemistry World author
9.11.2018

Levulinic acid

How one footballer's climate concerns led to the creation of a green chemistry company: Mike Freemantle discovers the story of Mathieu Flamini, GFBiochemicals and levulinic acid.
Chemistry World author
2.11.2018

Furanocoumarins

Florence Schechter discovers how a seemingly healthy grapefruit-based breakfast could disrupt your daily drugs
Chemistry World author
26.10.2018

Phenolphthalein

Kat Arney gets to the bottom of the story of phenolphthalein – a chemical with two very different uses. If you've measured pH in a classroom or had some trouble in the bathroom, you may have met this compound before. 
Chemistry World author
19.10.2018

Caryophyllene

A biologically active compound from the biblical balm of Gilead, said to ‘heal the sin-sick soul’
Chemistry World author
12.10.2018

Anatoxin-a

Gege Li on the compound formerly known by the no-nonsense name 'very fast death factor'
Chemistry World author
5.10.2018

Colchicine

Florence Schechter introduces an ancient, but effective, treatment for painful attacks of gout
Chemistry World author
28.09.2018

Indigo

What links blue jeans to ancient British warriors? Mike Freemantle discovers the blue dye with a colourful history
Chemistry World author
21.09.2018

Pentylone

The latest in an alarming trend of novel psychoactive substances being mis-sold at festivals as traditional street drugs, putting users at risk
Chemistry World author
14.09.2018

Antihistamines

As hayfever season comes to a close, Katrina Krämer examines antihistamines. From calming down a hyperactive immune system to increasing cognitive abilities, these small molecules have a big impact.
Chemistry World author
7.09.2018

Thaumetopoein

Kat Arney finds out about the 'toxic caterpillar' chemical that will make your skin crawl
Chemistry World author
31.08.2018

Ethyl iodoacetate

Michael Freemantle introduces a tear gas used by the British army in the first world war, picked, in part, because of our access to seaweed
Chemistry World author
24.08.2018

Benzaldehyde

Brian Clegg on the almond flavour compound that gives your taste buds a treat and may help rescue survivors from a disaster
Chemistry World author
17.08.2018

Asbestos

How the ‘world’s most wonderful mineral’ became one of the world’s biggest health hazards
Chemistry World author
10.08.2018

Bilirubin

Kat Arney investigates the chemicals responsible for giving bruises their hue and colouring your poo
Chemistry World author
2.08.2018

Naloxone

Katrina Krämer examines the overdose antidote that has saved tens of thousands of lives
Chemistry World author
27.07.2018

Fentanyl

A 1960s breakthrough in pain relief that now fuels the opioid crisis
Chemistry World author
20.07.2018

Lanolin

How a waxy mixture from a sheep's fleece helped create a global fashion brand
Chemistry World author
13.07.2018

Cannabidiol

Ben Valsler with the story of Charlotte Figi, Dravet syndrome and the cannabis compound controlling her condition.
Chemistry World author
5.07.2018

Potassium sulfide

Brian Clegg on a compound that keeps us well fed and looking radiant
Chemistry World author
28.06.2018

Warfarin

Katrina Krämer asks if an essential blood-thinning medicine ended Joseph Stalin’s 30-year rule over the Soviet Union
Chemistry World author
21.06.2018

Kerosene

Discover bat-borne-bombs and a classic chemistry textbook, as Mike Freemantle examines the history of kerosene
Chemistry World author