Along The Backbone

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Paleobiologist Dr. Matthew Bonnan explores the evolution of vertebrate anatomy, from bones to brains, through deep time.

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Website
https://alongthebackbone.wordpress.com
Description
The Evolution of Vertebrate Anatomy Through Deep Time
Language
🇬🇧 English
last modified
2019-06-06 18:48
last episode published
2012-02-17 04:01
publication frequency
25.68 days
Contributors
Dr. Matthew Bonnan, Ph.D. author  
Explicit
false
Number of Episodes
6
Rss-Feeds
Detail page
Categories
Science & Medicine Natural Sciences

Recommendations


Episodes

Date Thumb Title & Description Contributors
17.02.2012

Episode 8: Face the Face

Of all the vertebrate animals, only mammals have muscles of facial expression ... why?
Dr. Matthew Bonnan, Ph.D. author
5.11.2011

Episode 7: Hands Down, or, Why Velociraptor Could Not Open Doors

The ability to open doors depends on two things: 1) being able to grip the door handle and 2) being able to rotate the hand so that the door handle turns. Could a hungry Velociraptor turn a door handle to get at you, the delectable human in hiding?
Dr. Matthew Bonnan, Ph.D. author
1.11.2011

Episode 6: How the Dentist Came To Be So Important to Mammals

Why don't mammals continuously replace their teeth? The answer may surprise you.
Dr. Matthew Bonnan, Ph.D. author
24.10.2011

Episode 5: Elephants, Cats, and Ticking Clocks

Having upright limbs has advantages for mammals. And you probably want to know about how an elephant almost made Dr. Bonnan thinner.
Dr. Matthew Bonnan, Ph.D. author
14.10.2011

Episode 4: A Brief History of Meat

Many of us enjoy eating meat, but few of us pause to think about how important its pre-meal form, skeletal muscle, is for vertebrate life.
Dr. Matthew Bonnan, Ph.D. author
11.10.2011

Episode 3: How Do You Make a Snake?

It seems only fitting that a podcast series called Along the Backbone should discuss the formation of the backbone in one of lengthiest vertebrates: snakes.
Dr. Matthew Bonnan, Ph.D. author