World War I Podcast

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World War I created many of the political, cultural, and economic fault lines of the world today. Produced by the MacArthur Memorial, this podcast explores the causes, the major players, the battles, the technology, and the popular culture of World War I.

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Website
http://www.macarthurmemorial.org/367/World-War-I-Podcast-Series
Description
World War I created many of the political, cultural, and economic fault lines of the world today. Produced by the MacArthur Memorial, this podcast explores the causes, the major players, the battles, the technology, and the popular culture of World War I.
Language
🇬🇧 English
last modified
2018-03-28 15:54
last episode published
2018-03-28 15:54
publication frequency
38.29 days
Contributors
MacArthur Memorial author  
Amanda Williams owner  
Explicit
false
Number of Episodes
56
Rss-Feeds
Detail page
Categories
Society & Culture Education History

Recommendations


Episodes

Date Thumb Title & Description Contributors
28.03.2018

The Champagne Defensive, July 1918

In July 1918, Germany embarked on its final offensive of the war. This offensive called for a massive push across the old battlefields of the Champagne to the east and west of Reims in order to seize the rail center of Chalons sur Marne and cut off th...
MacArthur Memorial author
22.02.2018

The Lafayette Escadrille

In August 1914, as decade-old diplomatic crises erupted into war on the European continent, a group of American citizens, in defiance of US President Woodrow Wilson’s declaration of neutrality, volunteered for French military service. Of those American...
MacArthur Memorial author
17.10.2017

The Jolly Roger and World War I

The Jolly Roger is the default symbol of pirates and piracy. During World War I however, some British submarine crews began flying the Jolly Roger to indicate a successful patrol. This was somewhat problematic because World War I was also a war of pr...
MacArthur Memorial author
27.09.2017

Sergeant York

On October 8, 1918, during the Meuse Argonne Offensive, Alvin York led an attack on a German machine gun nest that neutralized more than 30 machine guns and killed at least 25 German soldiers. His efforts also resulted in the capture of 132 enemy sold...
MacArthur Memorial author
18.05.2017

America Prepares for War

In April 2017, the MacArthur Memorial and the Hampton Roads Naval Museum hosted a World War I symposium. Al Barnes, the Virginia National Guard Command Historian, gave a presentation entitled:"To Hell with the Kaiser: America Prepares for War." This ...
MacArthur Memorial author
16.05.2017

The Frontiersman in France

In April 2017, the MacArthur Memorial and the Hampton Roads Naval Museum hosted a World War I symposium. Jim Zobel, the archivist of the MacArthur Memorial, gave a presentation entitled:"A Frontiersman in France: Douglas MacArthur and the Rainbow Divi...
MacArthur Memorial author
26.04.2017

The Origins of Naval Station Norfolk

In April 2017, the MacArthur Memorial and the Hampton Roads Naval Museum hosted a World War I symposium. Joe Judge, curator of the Hampton Roads Naval Museum, gave a presentation entitled: “For the Pressing Need of the Service: The Origins of Naval St...
MacArthur Memorial author
20.03.2017

America's Foreign-Born Doughboys

In February 2017, we sat down with Al Barnes, the Virginia National Guard Command Historian and author of To Hell With the Kaiser, to discuss the many foreign-born doughboys that served in the U.S. Army during World War I. Barnes explained how these m...
MacArthur Memorial author
27.02.2017

The 93rd Division in World War I

In 1917, war mobilization plans included no black combat divisions. With only four black regiments in existence at the time, all the new African American volunteers and draftees presented the U.S. Army with a bit of a problem. Where did they fit in? ...
MacArthur Memorial author
4.01.2017

Into The Trenches: Luneville Baccarat Sector, Feb-March 1918

In February 1918, General John J. Pershing, commander of the American Expeditionary Force had only five divisions in France. One of those divisions, the 42nd “Rainbow” Division, had just arrived and had not yet experienced trench warfare. Along with ...
MacArthur Memorial author
28.11.2016

Verdun After 100 Years: An Iconic or Exceptional Battle

"Verdun After 100 Years: An Iconic or Exceptional Battle” In October 2016, the World War One Historical Association hosted a World War I Centennial Symposium at the MacArthur Memorial. Dr. Paul Jankowski, the Ray Ginger Professor of History at Brandei...
MacArthur Memorial author
26.11.2016

Eastern Front 1916: Russian Victory to Revolution

In October 2016, the World War One Historical Association hosted a World War I Centennial Symposium at the MacArthur Memorial. Dr. Graydon Tunstall, a senior lecturer in history at the University of South Florida, presented on the topic:"Eastern Front...
MacArthur Memorial author
25.11.2016

Embattled Neutrality: The Western Hemisphere, Europe, and Woodrow Wilson

In October 2016, the World War One Historical Association hosted a World War I Centennial Symposium at the MacArthur Memorial. Historian Paul Walsh examined American neutrality and the political difficulties faced by President Woodrow Wilson from 1914...
MacArthur Memorial author
25.11.2016

Haven of Safety: U.S. Internment of German Sailors, 1914-1917

In October 2016, the World War One Historical Association hosted a World War I Centennial Symposium at the MacArthur Memorial. Greg Hansard, the Manager of Web and Digital Resources at the Virginia Historical Society, presented on the topic: “Haven of...
MacArthur Memorial author
22.11.2016

Russian Air Assets in the Brusilov Offensive

In October 2016, the World War One Historical Association hosted a World War I Centennial Symposium at the MacArthur Memorial. Carl Bobrow, a member of the collections department at the National Air and Space Museum, presented on the topic: “Russian A...
MacArthur Memorial author
21.11.2016

A Citizen Army Learns to Fight: The Tactical Evolution of the British Army in 1916

In October 2016, the World War One Historical Association hosted a World War I Centennial Symposium at the MacArthur Memorial. Dr. David Silbey of Cornell University presented on the topic:"A Citizen Army Learns to Fight: The Tactical Evolution of the...
MacArthur Memorial author
21.11.2016

From Venice to London: Aerial Bombing in 1916

In October 2016, the World War One Historical Association hosted a World War I Centennial Symposium at the MacArthur Memorial. The focus of the Symposium was 1916, and that was an interesting year in terms of military aviation. During 1916, Austrian f...
MacArthur Memorial author
21.11.2016

Big Navies, Big Innovations, Big Battle...then Fizzle. Why?

In October 2016, the World War One Historical Association hosted a World War I Centennial Symposium at the MacArthur Memorial. William MacMullen, a member of the U.S. Navy League, the U.S. Naval Institute, and past Executive Director of the U.S. Naval...
MacArthur Memorial author
12.10.2016

Kaiser WIlhelm II: Part II

From 1890-1914, Kaiser Wilhelm II struggled through a series of scandals and crises. His gaffes on the international stage embarrassed his government and helped create the alliances that would be arrayed against Germany in 1914. Due to these issues, ...
MacArthur Memorial author
18.07.2016

Kaiser Wilhelm II: Part I

Kaiser Wilhelm II: Part One When the World War I ended, King George V of England wrote of his cousin Kaiser Wilhelm II: “…I look upon him as the greatest criminal known for having plunged the world into this ghastly war.” But who was Kaiser Wilhelm II?...
MacArthur Memorial author
4.04.2016

The Zimmerman Telegram

On January 16, 1917, a coded German dispatch was intercepted by British Naval Intelligence. Over the next weeks, cryptographers in the innocuous sounding Room 40 began deciphering the message. What they found was shocking. Germany was proposing to b...
MacArthur Memorial author
2.02.2016

African American Doctors of World War I

In this podcast, W. Douglas Fisher and Joann H. Buckley, authors of the book: African American Doctors of World War I, shed light on the little known story of African American doctors who served during World War I. Fisher and Buckley discuss the diffi...
MacArthur Memorial author
14.01.2016

The Occupation of Germany

When World War I ended, parts of the American Expeditionary Force were sent into Germany to serve as an occupation force. The Occupation of Germany (1918-1923) would be regarded as the most successful U.S. military occupation in history until the Occu...
MacArthur Memorial author
11.12.2015

Allenby Captures Jerusalem

While sometimes considered a “sideshow” in histories of World War I, the Middle East was a region of considerable value to both the Allied and Central powers. As stalemate mired the Western front, both sides expended vast amounts of men and treasure i...
MacArthur Memorial author
11.11.2015

The Road to Armistice

By late September 1918, Germany’s military leaders were aware that victory was completely out of reach. General Erich Ludendorff and Field Marshall Paul von Hindenburg began to call for an immediate armistice, arguing that it was in Germany’s best int...
MacArthur Memorial author
22.09.2015

Pope Benedict XV and the Great War

Just weeks into the Great War, Pope Pius X died. A cardinal for all of three months, Giacomo Paolo Giovanni Battista della Chiesa joined the resulting conclave to elect a new Pope. The cardinals assembled debated whether to elect an experienced diplo...
MacArthur Memorial author
24.08.2015

Lettow-Vorbeck and German East Africa

During World War I, German Major General Paul Emil von Lettow-Vorbeck led the British Army on a four year cat and mouse chase through German East Africa and its surroundings in what was called the “Little War.” Over the course of this “Little War,” hi...
MacArthur Memorial author
10.08.2015

Hoover the Humanitarian

Today Herbert Hoover is remembered for being president when the Great Depression started. As a result, he is often blamed for not doing enough to relieve the distress caused by that economic crisis. But was Hoover really disinterested in the sufferin...
MacArthur Memorial author
30.07.2015

Animals in World War I

From transportation, to communication, security, comfort and morale, animals have been indispensable human partners throughout history. It is therefore not surprising that animals have played important roles in military conflicts. During World War I,...
MacArthur Memorial author
7.05.2015

RMS Lusitania

The sinking of the passenger liner RMS Lusitania on May 7, 1915 was one of the great controversies of World War I. Targeted by a German U-Boat as part of a campaign of unrestricted submarine warfare, the Lusitania was carrying 1,266 passengers and 696...
MacArthur Memorial author
22.04.2015

Gallipoli: Crucible of Nations

The 1915 Gallipoli Campaign was an imaginative operation that was supposed to end the stalemate of the Western Front. It utilized a mix of troops mainly from Britain, France, Australia and New Zealand. As these troops sailed towards Gallipoli, some c...
MacArthur Memorial author
11.02.2015

Albert I: King of the Belgians

Since the days of Julius Caesar, the territory of what is now Belgium has been a thoroughfare and battleground for foreign armies. Hoping to avoid being ravaged by future wars, modern Belgium committed itself to a policy of neutrality. This neutrality...
MacArthur Memorial author
10.12.2014

Battle of the Atlantic: The East Coast of the United States during World War I

In November 2014, the MacArthur Memorial hosted a World War I Centennial Symposium. Joseph Hoyt, a maritime archeologist with NOAA and a specialist in the archaeological recording of deep water shipwrecks, presented on the topic of World War I and the...
MacArthur Memorial author
9.12.2014

Josephus Daniels

In November 2014, the MacArthur Memorial hosted a World War I Centennial Symposium. Dr. Lee Craig was one of the presenters. Dr. Craig is the author of Josephus Daniels, the story of the Secretary of the Navy, who helped to prepare the U.S. Navy for ...
MacArthur Memorial author
5.12.2014

The Archaeology of the Western Front

In November 2014, the MacArthur Memorial hosted a World War I Centennial Symposium. Andrew Robertshaw, author of the book Digging the Trenches, was one of the Symposium presenters. Over the last 25 years, Mr. Robertshaw has directed numerous archaeol...
MacArthur Memorial author
4.12.2014

World War I as Global War: Japan and the Dawn of the Asia/Pacific World

In November 2014, the MacArthur Memorial hosted a World War I Centennial Symposium. Dr. Frederick Dickinson was one of the Symposium presenters. Dr. Dickinson is a Professor of Japanese History at the University of Pennsylvania and the author of War ...
MacArthur Memorial author
3.12.2014

The Battle of the Marne 1914: One Hundred Years Later

In November 2014, the MacArthur Memorial hosted a World War I Centennial Symposium. Dr. Holger Herwig was one of the Symposium presenters. Dr. Herwig is the author of numerous books, including The Marne, 1914. His presentation focused on the importa...
MacArthur Memorial author
28.11.2014

A Royal Countdown to War

In November 2014, the MacArthur Memorial hosted a World War I Centennial Symposium. Catrine Clay was one of the Symposium presenters. Ms. Clay is the author of King Kaiser Tsar - a work that explores the relationships between the royal cousins King G...
MacArthur Memorial author
15.07.2014

The North Sea Barrage

The Allies and Central Powers employed hundreds of thousands of sea mines during the Great War. These mines were commonly used to defend coastlines and strategic locations from invasion – but they were also used as part of a broader anti-submarine cam...
MacArthur Memorial author
24.04.2014

The Red Baron

Some of the great heroes of World War I were the “aces” – pilots who were credited with bringing down large numbers of enemy planes. These dashing young pilots captured the imagination of the public and imbued the war with a sense of romanticism. The...
MacArthur Memorial author
6.03.2014

Woodrow Wilson Part III: After the War

This podcast features the third of three interviews that were recorded at the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library in Staunton, VA. The third installment in this series tells the story of Wilson after the war. Traveling to France at the end of the war ...
MacArthur Memorial author
3.03.2014

Woodrow Wilson Part II: During the War

This podcast features the second of three interviews that were recorded at the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library in Staunton, VA. The second installment in this series tells the story of Wilson during the war. Elected to be a president focused prim...
MacArthur Memorial author
28.02.2014

Woodrow Wilson Part I: Before the War

This podcast features the first of three interviews that were recorded at the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library in Staunton, VA. The first installment in this series traces the meteoric rise of American President Woodrow Wilson – from his days as a ...
MacArthur Memorial author
25.12.2013

Christmas Truce, 1914

As dusk arrived on December 24, 1914, it was a cold night on the Western Front. It had been five months since the start of the war, and already, German, French and British Armies, slugging it out in the mud of Flanders, had experienced unimaginable ca...
MacArthur Memorial author
19.09.2013

The 42nd Division: Winter 1917-1918

1917 was a winter of gloom for the Allies. The British had lost more than 400,000 men in their failed offensive at Passchendaele in the previous summer and fall. That was followed by mutinies of nearly half of all French Army units after the failed N...
MacArthur Memorial author
15.08.2013

The War Dead and the Politics of Commemoration

Dr. Lisa Budreau, author of Bodies of War: World War I and the politics of commemoration in America 1919-1933, visited the MacArthur Memorial in October 2012 and lectured on the topic of repatriation, memorialization, and the creation of American cemet...
MacArthur Memorial author
19.06.2013

Dazzle Painting

World War I was a war of production and supply: whoever could feed their populations and soldiers, make the most weapons, and marshal the most resources would win the war. Surrounded by enemies on land, and desperate to break the trans-Atlantic trade ...
MacArthur Memorial author
29.05.2013

The Journey to France

The North Atlantic is cold and stormy in October and November, and it loomed as a dreaded specter to thousands of members of the 42nd Rainbow Division at Camp Mills who had never seen the ocean much less taken a twelve day journey across it. Furthermo...
MacArthur Memorial author
8.03.2013

Camp Mills

Situated on Hempstead Plain in Long Island, New York, Camp Mills was the primary training ground of the 42nd Rainbow Division. The camp was swiftly constructed in the summer of 1917 and soon 27,000 men and 991 officers of the Rainbow Division began ar...
MacArthur Memorial author
31.01.2013

Formation of the 42nd"Rainbow" Division

When the United States declared war on Germany in 1917, it had an absolutely miniscule standing army. As the US Army General Staff began frantically preparing to mobilize an American Expeditionary Force, an internal debate arouse about the type of arm...
MacArthur Memorial author