Freakonomics Radio

https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Have fun discovering the hidden side of everything with host Stephen J. Dubner, co-author of the best-selling "Freakonomics” books. Each week, hear surprising conversations that explore the riddles of everyday life and the weird wrinkles of human nature—from cheating and crime to parenting and sports. Dubner talks with Nobel laureates and provocateurs, social scientists and entrepreneurs — and his “Freakonomics” co-author Steve Levitt. After just a few episodes, this podcast will have you too thinking like a Freak. Produced by WNYC Studios, home of other great podcasts such as “Radiolab," "Death, Sex& Money," and "On the Media."

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Website
http://www.wnyc.org/articles/freakonomics-podcast
Description
In their books "Freakonomics," "SuperFreakonomics" and "Think Like a Freak", Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner explore "the hidden side of everything," telling stories about cheating schoolteachers and eating champions while teaching us all to think a bit more creatively, rationally, and productively. The Freakonomics Radio podcast, hosted by Dubner, carries on that tradition with weekly episodes. Prepare to be enlightened, engaged, perhaps enraged, and definitely surprised.
Language
🇬🇧 English
last modified
2019-12-12 15:50
last episode published
2019-12-12 04:00
publication frequency
7.18 days
Contributors
Stephen J. Dubner and WNYC Studios author  
Explicit
false
Number of Episodes
502
Rss-Feeds
Detail page
Categories
Society & Culture

Recommendations


Episodes

Date Thumb Title & Description Contributors
12.12.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

How to Hate Taxes a Little Bit Less

Every year, Americans short the I.R.S. nearly half a trillion dollars. Most ideas to increase compliance are more stick than carrot — scary letters, audits, and penalties. But what if we gave taxpayers a chance to allocate how their money is spent, or ...
5.12.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Honey, I Grew the Economy

Innovation experts have long overlooked where a lot of innovation actually happens. The personal computer, the mountain bike, the artificial pancreas — none of these came from some big R&D lab, but from users tinkering in their homes. Acknowledging...
28.11.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

How to Change Your Mind (Ep. 379 Rebroadcast)

There are a lot of barriers to changing your mind: ego, overconfidence, inertia — and cost. Politicians who flip-flop get mocked; family and friends who cross tribal borders are shunned. But shouldn’t we be encouraging people to change their minds? And...
21.11.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

The Truth About the Vaping Crisis

A recent outbreak of illness and death has gotten everyone’s attention — including late-to-the-game regulators. But would a ban on e-cigarettes do more harm than good? We smoke out the facts.
14.11.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

How to Save $32 Million in One Hour

For nearly a decade, governments have been using behavioral nudges to solve problems — and the strategy is catching on in healthcare, firefighting, and policing. But is that thinking too small? Could nudging be used to fight income inequality and achie...
7.11.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Why Does Tipping Still Exist?

It’s an acutely haphazard way of paying workers, and yet it keeps expanding. We dig into the data to find out why.
31.10.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Speak Softly and Carry Big Data

Do economic sanctions work? Are big democracies any good at spreading democracy? What is the root cause of terrorism? It turns out that data analysis can help answer all these questions — and make better foreign-policy decisions. Guests include former ...
24.10.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Does Hollywood Still Have a Princess Problem?

For decades, there’s been a huge gender disparity both on-screen and behind the scenes. But it seems like cold, hard data — with an assist from the actor Geena Davis — may finally be moving the needle.
17.10.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Can Britain Get Its “Great” Back?

It used to be a global capital of innovation, invention, and exploration. Now it’s best known for its messy European divorce. We visit London to see if the British spirit of discovery is still alive. Guests include the mayor of London, undersea explore...
10.10.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

The Prime Minister Who Cried Brexit

In 2016, David Cameron held a referendum on whether the U.K. should stay in the European Union. A longtime Euroskeptic, he nevertheless led the Remain campaign. So what did Cameron really want? We ask him that and much more — including why he left offi...
3.10.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

America’s Math Curriculum Doesn’t Add Up

Most high-school math classes are still preparing students for the Sputnik era. Steve Levitt wants to get rid of the “geometry sandwich” and instead have kids learn what they really need in the modern era: data fluency.
26.09.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Fed Up

Mary Daly rose from high-school dropout to president of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. She thinks the central bank needs an upgrade too. It starts with recognizing that the economy is made up of actual humans.
19.09.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

How to Make Meetings Less Terrible

In the U.S. alone, we hold 55 million meetings a day. Most of them are woefully unproductive, and tyrannize our offices. The revolution begins now — with better agendas, smaller invite lists, and an embrace of healthy conflict.
12.09.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Yes, the Open Office Is Terrible — But It Doesn’t Have to Be (Rebroadcast)

It began as a post-war dream for a more collaborative and egalitarian workplace. It has evolved into a nightmare of noise and discomfort. Can the open office be saved, or should we all just be working from home?
5.09.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

The Economics of Sports Gambling

What happens when tens of millions of fantasy-sports players are suddenly able to bet real money on real games? We’re about to find out. A recent Supreme Court decision has cleared the way to bring an estimated $300 billion in black-market sports betti...
29.08.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

The Future of Meat (Rebroadcast)

Global demand for beef, chicken, and pork continues to rise. So do concerns about environmental and other costs. Will reconciling these two forces be possible — or, even better, Impossible™?
22.08.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Should America Be Run by … Trader Joe’s? (Rebroadcast)

The quirky little grocery chain with California roots and German ownership has a lot to teach all of us about choice architecture, efficiency, frugality, collaboration, and team spirit.
15.08.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Hello, My Name Is Marijuana Pepsi!

Research shows that having a distinctively black name doesn’t affect your economic future. But what is the day-to-day reality of living with such a name? Marijuana Pepsi Vandyck, a newly-minted Ph.D., is well-qualified to answer this question. Her verd...
8.08.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

How Much Does Your Name Matter? (Rebroadcast)

A kid’s name can tell us something about his parents — their race, social standing, even their politics. But is your name really your destiny?
1.08.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

How the Supermarket Helped America Win the Cold War

Aisle upon aisle of fresh produce, cheap meat, and sugary cereal — a delicious embodiment of free-market capitalism, right? Not quite. The supermarket was in fact the endpoint of the U.S. government’s battle for agricultural abundance against the U.S.S...
25.07.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

America’s Hidden Duopoly (Rebroadcast)

We all know our political system is “broken” — but what if that’s not true? Some say the Republicans and Democrats constitute a wildly successful industry that has colluded to kill off competition, stifle reform, and drive the country apart. So what ar...
18.07.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

What Do Nancy Pelosi, Taylor Swift, and Serena Williams Have in Common?

They — along with a great many other high-achieving women — were all once Girl Scouts. So was Sylvia Acevedo. Raised in a poor, immigrant family, she was told that “girls like her” didn’t go to college. But she did, and then became a rocket scientist a...
11.07.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Abortion and Crime, Revisited

The controversial theory linking Roe v. Wade to a massive crime drop is back in the spotlight as several states introduce abortion restrictions. Steve Levitt and John Donohue discuss their original research, the challenges to its legitimacy, and their ...
4.07.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

A Better Way to Eat (Rebroadcast)

Takeru Kobayashi revolutionized the sport of competitive eating. What can the rest of us learn from his breakthrough?
27.06.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

The Zero-Minute Workout

There is strong evidence that exercise is wildly beneficial. There is even stronger evidence that most people hate to exercise. So if a pill could mimic the effects of working out, why wouldn’t we want to take it?
20.06.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

How Goes the Behavior-Change Revolution?

An all-star team of behavioral scientists discovers that humans are stubborn (and lazy, and sometimes dumber than dogs). We also hear about binge drinking, humblebragging, and regrets. Recorded live in Philadelphia with guests including Richard Thaler,...
13.06.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Long-Term Thinking in a Start-Up Town

Recorded live in San Francisco. Guests include the keeper of a 10,000-year clock, the co-founder of Lyft, a pioneer in male birth control, a specialist in water security, and a psychology professor who is also a puppy. With co-host Angela Duckworth, fa...
6.06.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Notes From an Imperfect Paradise

Recorded live in Los Angeles. Guests include Mayor Eric Garcetti, the “Earthquake Lady,” the head of the Port of L.A., and a scientist with NASA’s Planetary Protection team. With co-host Angela Duckworth, fact-checker Mike Maughan, and the worldwide de...
30.05.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

How to Change Your Mind

There are a lot of barriers to changing your mind: ego, overconfidence, inertia — and cost. Politicians who flip-flop get mocked; family and friends who cross tribal borders are shunned. But shouldn’t we be encouraging people to change their minds? And...
23.05.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Here’s Why All Your Projects Are Always Late — and What to Do About It (Rebroadcast)

Whether it’s a giant infrastructure plan or a humble kitchen renovation, it’ll inevitably take way too long and cost way too much. That’s because you suffer from “the planning fallacy.” (You also have an “optimism bias” and a bad case of overconfidence...
16.05.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

23andMe (and You, and Everyone Else)

The revolution in home DNA testing is giving consumers important, possibly life-changing information. It’s also building a gigantic database that could lead to medical breakthroughs. But how will you deal with upsetting news? What if your privacy is co...
9.05.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

The $1.5 Trillion Question: How to Fix Student-Loan Debt?

As the cost of college skyrocketed, it created a debt burden that’s putting a drag on the economy. One possible solution: shifting the risk of debt away from students and onto investors looking for a cut of the graduates’ earning power.
2.05.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

The Data-Driven Guide to Sane Parenting

Humans have been having kids forever, so why are modern parents so bewildered? The economist Emily Oster marshals the evidence on the most contentious topics — breastfeeding and sleep training, vaccines and screen time — and tells her fellow parents to...
25.04.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

The Invisible Paw (Rebroadcast)

Humans, it has long been thought, are the only animal to engage in economic activity. But what if we've had it exactly backward?
18.04.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

The Most Interesting Fruit in the World

The banana used to be a luxury good. Now it’s the most popular fruit in the U.S. and elsewhere. But the production efficiencies that made it so cheap have also made it vulnerable to a deadly fungus that may wipe out the one variety most of us eat. Scie...
11.04.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

How Spotify Saved the Music Industry (But Not Necessarily Musicians)

Daniel Ek, a 23-year-old Swede who grew up on pirated music, made the record labels an offer they couldn’t refuse: a legal platform to stream all the world’s music. Spotify reversed the labels’ fortunes, made Ek rich, and thrilled millions of music fan...
4.04.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Why Rent Control Doesn’t Work

As cities become ever-more expensive, politicians and housing advocates keep calling for rent control. Economists think that’s a terrible idea. They say it helps a small (albeit noisy) group of renters, but keeps overall rents artificially high by disi...
28.03.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Freakonomics Radio Live: “Would You Eat a Piece of Chocolate Shaped Like Dog Poop?”

What your disgust level says about your politics, how Napoleon influenced opera, why New York City’s subways may finally run on time, and more. Five compelling guests tell Stephen Dubner, co-host Angela Duckworth, and fact-checker Jody Avirgan lots of ...
21.03.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Why You Shouldn’t Open a Restaurant (Ep. 347 Update)

Kenji Lopez-Alt became a rock star of the food world by bringing science into the kitchen in a way that everyday cooks can appreciate. Then he dared to start his own restaurant — and discovered problems that even science can’t solve.
14.03.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

A Free-Trade Democrat in the Trump White House

For years, Gary Cohn thought he’d be the next C.E.O. of Goldman Sachs. Instead, he became the “adult in the room” in a chaotic administration. Cohn talks about the fights he won, the fights he lost, and the fights he was no longer willing to have. Also...
7.03.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

How to Fail Like a Pro

The road to success is paved with failure, so you might as well learn to do it right. (Ep. 5 of the “How to Be Creative” series.)
28.02.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

A Good Idea Is Not Good Enough

Whether you’re building a business or a cathedral, execution is everything. We ask artists, scientists, and inventors how they turned ideas into reality. And we find out why it’s so hard for a group to get things done — and what you can do about it. (E...
21.02.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Where Do Good Ideas Come From?

Whether you’re mapping the universe, hosting a late-night talk show, or running a meeting, there are a lot of ways to up your idea game. Plus: the truth about brainstorming. (Ep. 3 of the “How to Be Creative” series.)
14.02.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

The Future of Meat

Global demand for beef, chicken, and pork continues to rise. So do concerns about environmental and other costs. Will reconciling these two forces be possible — or, even better, Impossible™?
7.02.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

This Economist Predicted the Last Crisis. What’s the Next One?

In 2005, Raghuram Rajan said the financial system was at risk “of a catastrophic meltdown.” After stints at the I.M.F. and India’s central bank, he sees another potential crisis — and he offers a solution. Is it stronger governments? Freer markets? Raj...
2.02.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Extra: Domonique Foxworth Full Interview

Stephen Dubner’s conversation with the former N.F.L. player, union official, and all-around sports thinker, recorded for our “Hidden Side of Sports” series.
31.01.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Not Just Another Labor Force

If you think talent and hard work give top athletes all the leverage to succeed, think again. As employees in the Sports-Industrial Complex, they’ve got a tight earnings window, a high injury rate, little choice in where they work — and a very early fo...
26.01.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Extra: Mark Cuban Full Interview

A conversation with the Shark Tank star, entrepreneur, and Dallas Mavericks owner recorded for the Freakonomics Radio series “The Hidden Side of Sports.”
24.01.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Inside the Sports-Industrial Complex

For most of us, the athletes are what make sports interesting. But if you own the team or run the league, your players are essentially very expensive migrant workers who eat into your profits. We talk to N.F.L., N.B.A., and U.F.C. executives about labo...
19.01.2019 https://media2.wnyc.org/i/1400/1400/l/80/1/wn16_wnycstudios_freakonomics-rev3.png

Extra: Mark Teixeira Full Interview

A conversation with former Major League Baseball player and current ESPN analyst Mark Teixeira, recorded for the Freakonomics Radio series “The Hidden Side of Sports.”