Science Friday

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Covering everything about science and technology -- from the outer reaches of space to the tiniest microbes in our bodies -- Science Friday is your source for entertaining and educational stories and activities. Each week, host Ira Flatow interviews scientists and inventors like Sylvia Earle, Elon Musk, Neil deGrasse Tyson, and more.

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Website
http://www.sciencefriday.com/
Description
Covering everything about science and technology -- from the outer reaches of space to the tiniest microbes in our bodies -- Science Friday is your source for entertaining and educational stories and activities. Each week, host Ira Flatow interviews scientists and inventors like Sylvia Earle, Elon Musk, Neil deGrasse Tyson, and more.
Language
🇬🇧 English
last modified
2019-03-16 03:56
last episode published
2019-03-15 16:32
publication frequency
51.2 days
Contributors
Science Friday owner   author  
Explicit
false
Number of Episodes
352
Rss-Feeds
Detail page
Categories
Science & Medicine

Recommendations


Episodes

Date Thumb Title & Description Contributors
15.03.2019

Frans de Waal, Inactive Ingredients, Street View, and Gentrification. March 15, 2019, Part 2

Primatologist Frans de Waal has spent his lifetime studying the lives of animals, especially our closest cousins, the chimpanzees. de Waal has observed their shifting alliances and the structure of their political ranks. He has seen bitter conflicts br...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
15.03.2019

Youth Climate Protest, Science Talent Search Winners, Snowflake Changes. March 15, 2019, Part 1

It all started with 16-year-old environmental activist Greta Thunberg. Last August, Thunberg started skipping school on Fridays to protest outside Sweden’s parliament, insisting her country get behind the Paris Climate Agreement. Her protests have insp...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
12.03.2019

SciFri Extra: Celebrating The Elements

Do you have a favorite chemical element? Neurologist Oliver Sacks did—he was partial to dense, high melting-point metals, especially those metals between hafnium and platinum on the periodic table. This month marks the 150th anniversary of chemist Dmi...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
8.03.2019

HIV Remission, Bones, Jumping Spiders. March 8, 2019, Part 2

Nearly twelve years ago, a cancer patient infected with HIV received two bone marrow transplants to wipe out his leukemia. Now, researchers in the United Kingdom reported in Nature earlier this week that their patient, a man known only as “the London p...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
8.03.2019

NASA Administrator, California Wildfires, Lichens. March 8, 2019, Part 1

On December 14, 1972, as Apollo 17 astronaut Eugene Cernan prepared to board the lunar module, he gave one last dispatch from the lunar surface. And yet, 47 years later, humankind has not set another foot on the lunar surface. But now, NASA’s ready to ...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
1.03.2019

Icefish, Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster, Wireless Baby Monitoring. March 1, 2019, Part 2

During an electrical system test early in in the morning of April 26, 1986, Reactor 4 of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant exploded. The disaster at the plant was not caused solely by the test, however—a perfect storm of engineering and design missteps...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
1.03.2019

Synthetic Genomes, Climate Panel, Local Recycling. March 1, 2019, Part 1

DNA is the universal programming language for life, and the specific code to that program are the combination of the base pairs adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine. But are those the only base pairs that could be used to create DNA? Scientists looki...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
27.02.2019

SciFri Extra: A Night Of Volcanoes And Earthquakes With N.K. Jemisin

The Science Friday Book Club discussion of N.K. Jemisin’s The Fifth Season may have stopped erupting for the season, but we have one more piece of volcanic goodness for you. SciFri producer and chief bookworm Christie Taylor got the chance to speak wit...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
22.02.2019

Black Holes, California Megaflood. Feb 22, 2019, Part 2

When it floods in California, the culprit is usually what’s known as an atmospheric river—a narrow ribbon of ultra-moist air moving in from over the Pacific Ocean. Atmospheric rivers are also essential sources of moisture for western reservoirs and mou...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
22.02.2019

Telescope Decisions, Grape Plasma, Israeli Moon Lander. Feb 22, 2019, Part 1

The American Astronomical Society meeting is the largest annual gathering of astronomers and astrophysicists. It’s not known for drama. But this year, the buzz in the room wasn’t too different from the nervous energy during an awards night. That’s beca...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
15.02.2019

Declining Insects, Sunny Day Flooding, Liquid Rules. Feb 15, 2019, Part 2

 That once vibrant forest has gotten quieter and emptier, as many of the insects— and the animals that depend on them—have disappeared. In a worldwide report card on the state of insects in the journal Biological Conservation, the conclusion is dire: “...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
15.02.2019

SciFri Book Club: ‘The Fifth Season.’ Feb 15, 2019, Part 1

In this final installment of the winter Book Club, we wrap up a winter of exploring The Stillness, learning how volcanologists research lava flows and crater tremors, and even diving into the center of the earth. Ira joins Science Friday SciArts produc...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
8.02.2019

Buttons, Grand Canyon Maps, Mosquitoes. Feb 8, 2019, Part 2

The button is everywhere. It allows us to interact with our computers and technology, alerts us when someone is at the front door, and with a tap, can have dinner delivered to your home. But buttons also are often associated with feelings of control, p...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
8.02.2019

Earth’s Core, Govt Data In The Cloud, Book Club. Feb 8, 2019, Part 1

At the very center of the Earth is a solid lump of iron and nickel that might be as hot as the surface of the Sun. This solid core is thought to be why our magnetic field is as strong as it is. As the core grows, energy is transferred to the outer core...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
1.02.2019

Sleep and the Immune System, Measuring Carbon, Specimens of Hair. Feb 1, 2019, Part 2

Some citizen scientists collect minerals or plants. But 19th-century lawyer Peter A. Browne collected hair—lots and lots of hair. His collection started innocently enough. Browne decided to make a scientific study of wool with the hope of jumpstarting ...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
1.02.2019

Digital Art, Lava Lab, Desalination. Feb 1, 2019, Part 1

A series of lines on a wall, drawn by museum staff, from instructions written by an artist. A textile print made from scanning the screen of an Apple IIe computer, printing onto heat transfer material, and ironing the result onto fabric. A Java program...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
25.01.2019

Medical Conflict Of Interest, Saturn’s Rings, Bear Brook Podcast. Jan 25, 2019, Part 2

Most scientific journals go by the honor system when it comes to conflicts of interest: They ask, and the researchers tell. But that system might be due for an overhaul. A recent ProPublica and New York Times investigation found that a top cancer resea...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
25.01.2019

Weather Advances, Listening to Volcanoes, Phragmites. Jan 25, 2019, Part 1

Your smartphone gives you up-to-the-minute weather forecast updates at the tap of a button. Every newscast has a weather segment. And outlets like the Weather Channel talk weather all day, every day. But how much has the process of predicting the weath...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
22.01.2019

SciFri Extra: ‘Behind The Sheet’ Of Gynecology’s Darker History

The 19th-century physician J. Marion Sims may have gone down in history as the “father of modern gynecology,” but Sims’ fistula cure was the result of experimental surgeries, pre-Emancipation, on at least 11 enslaved black women. Only three of whose na...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
18.01.2019

Gynecology’s Dark History, Antarctic Ice, Moon Craters. Jan 18, 2019, Part 2

Nineteenth-century physician J. Marion Sims has gone down in history as the “father of modern gynecology.” He invented the speculum, devised body positions to make gynecological exams easier, and discovered a method for closing vaginal fistulas, a pain...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
18.01.2019

Book Club, Green New Deal, Louisiana Shrimpers. Jan 18, 2019, Part 1

In a world roiled continuously by earthquakes, volcanoes, and other tectonic disasters large and small, a cataclysmic earthquake is about to change the course of human history… again. On the same day, a woman comes home to find her son dead, killed by ...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
11.01.2019

Heart and Exercise, Consumer Electronics Show, Black Holes. Jan 11, 2019, Part 2

You’ve heard the news that smoking is bad for your health. But it turns out not exercising could be even worse for your chances of survival, according to a recent study in the journal JAMA Network Open. But is it possible to overdo it? While you’re try...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
11.01.2019

Shutdown and Science, Smartphone and Overdoses. Jan 11, 2019, Part 1

The partial shutdown of the U.S. government is approaching its third week, and it has caused a backlog for scientists employed or funded by the government. Scientists have had to leaving data collection and experiments in limbo. The Food and Drug Admin...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
4.01.2019

Diets, Crowd Physics, Snowflake Citizen Science. January 4, 2019, Part 1

Earlier this week, hundreds of thousands of revelers huddled together under the pouring rain in Times Square for an annual tradition: to watch the New Year’s ball drop. But once the clock struck midnight, the song was sung, and the loved ones were kiss...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
4.01.2019

Winter Birding. January 4, 2019, Part 2

Every year in the dead of winter, bird lovers flock in large numbers to count as many birds as they possibly can on a single day. This is the Audubon Society’s annual Christmas Bird Count, a citizen science effort to track the trends of bird numbers ov...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
28.12.2018

2018 Scifri Year In Review. Dec 28, 2018, Part 1

In 2018, natural disasters around the world bore the unmistakable fingerprints of human-caused climate change. The federal government’s 1,600-page National Climate Assessment predicted even more extreme events—floods that destroy infrastructure, warmin...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
28.12.2018

American Eden, New Horizons To Ultima Thule. Dec 28, 2018, Part 2

Every holiday season, tourists throng Rockefeller Center to see the famous tree, soaring above the paved plazas and fountains. But more than 200 years ago, they would have found avocado and fig trees there, along with kumquats, cotton, and wheat—all sp...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
21.12.2018

Fetal Cell Research, Schadenfreude, Deer Disease. Dec 21, 2018, Part 2

The Trump administration is cracking down on federal scientists seeking fetal tissue for their work, while it conducts a “comprehensive review” of research involving fetal cells. One HIV research program that uses fetal tissue to create humanized mice ...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
21.12.2018

Food Myths, Kids Flu Shot, Europe Plastics Ban. Dec 21, 2018, Part 1

You’ve probably heard of the five second rule, when you drop a cookie on the floor and take a bite anyway because it’s only been a few seconds. What about when you’re at a party and you see someone double dip a chip in the salsa? How much bacteria does...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
14.12.2018

Future Telescopes, Caterpillars. Dec 14, 2018, Part 2

28 years ago, astronauts on the space shuttle Discovery gently raised the Hubble Space Telescope, or HST, up from the shuttle bay, and released it into space. Geologist and astronaut Kathryn Sullivan commemorated the moment with a short speech, as she ...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
14.12.2018

Cancer Immunotherapy, Raccoons, Frog Calls. Dec 14, 2018, Part 1

For years, cancer treatment has largely involved one of three options—surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. In recent years, however, a new treatment option, immunotherapy, has entered the playing field. It has become the first-line preferred treatment ...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
7.12.2018

Microbes and Art, Science Books 2018. Dec 7, 2018, Part 2

Here at Science Friday, our jobs involve reading a lot of science books every year. We have piles and piles of them at the office. Hundreds of titles about biology and art and technology and space, and sometimes even sci-fi. Now, the time has come for ...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
7.12.2018

Hemp and CBD, Phytosaurs, Mosquito Control. Dec 7, 2018, Part 1

Good news could be coming soon for anyone interested in hemp, the THC-free, no-high strain of cannabis whose use ranges from fibers to food to pharmaceuticals. If the 2018 Farm Bill passes Congress in its current form, growing hemp would be legal and p...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
30.11.2018

Gene-Editing Humans, Asymmetry, Ancient Whale Ancestor. Nov 30, 2018, Part 2

The first CRISPR-edited babies are (probably) here. The news raises social, ethical, and regulatory questions—for both scientists and society. Then, why are human bodies asymmetrical? A single protein could help explain why. And finally, ever wondered ...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
30.11.2018

Climate Report, Wind Energy, SciFri Educator Collaborative. Nov 30, 2018, Part 1

This Monday, Mars fans rejoiced as NASA’s lander Mars InSight successfully parachuted safely onto the large, flat plain of Elysium Planitia. In the days that followed, the lander successfully has deployed its solar panels and begun to unstow its roboti...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
23.11.2018

2018 Ig Nobel Prizes. Nov 23, 2018, Part 1

When you go to the zoo, maybe you imitate the chimps, copying their faces, their gestures, or their walk. But it turns out the chimps imitate you just about as often—and as well, according to scientists. Other researchers have found that a trained nose...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
23.11.2018

Caves And Climate, Environmental Archeology, Scanning The Past. Nov 23, 2018, Part 2

When you think of an archaeologist, you might imagine a scientist in the field wielding shovels and pickaxes, screening through dirt to uncover artifacts and structures buried deep in the ground. But what about those areas that you can’t reach or even ...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
16.11.2018

California Fires, Fire Engineering, Flu Near You. Nov 16, 2018, Part 1

When wildfires strike, the conversation typically centers around natural factors: forest management, climate change, or hot dry winds that fan the flames. But there’s another important factor in wildfire risk: what humans build. Not just where we build...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
16.11.2018

Smell Science, Reader Come Home, Sonar Smackdown. Nov 16, 2018, Part 2

If you had to give up one of your senses, which would you pick? If you think that “smell” might be the obvious answer, consider that your nose plays a crucial role in how you perceive the taste of your food or that it’s a sophisticated sensor capable o...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
9.11.2018

Immigration and the Microbiome, Spice Trends. Nov 9, 2018, Part 1

‘Tis the season for pumpkin spice lattes. Even if you’re not a fan of the fall beverage, we’ve all been touched by the 15-year dominance of Starbucks’ signature PSL (that’s pumpkin spice latte in coffee lingo) and its pumpkin spice spawn. So what is it...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
9.11.2018

Heart History, Disease Seasonality, Beatboxing. Nov 9, 2018, Part 2

The case presented a medical mystery. A man had entered his doctor’s office complaining of chest pain, so his doctors ordered an angiogram, an X-ray of the arteries of his heart. His condition was serious: a complete blockage of one of his coronary art...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
2.11.2018

Physics Mysteries, Appendix and Parkinson’s, Paralysis Treatment. Nov 2, 2018, Part 2

Ever wondered why your dog’s back-and-forth shaking is so effective at getting you wet? Or how bugs, birds, and lizards can run across water—but we can’t? Or how about why cockroaches are so darn good at navigating in the dark? Those are just a few of ...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
2.11.2018

Local Science Issues, Dolphin Calls, Kepler Death. Nov 2, 2018, Part 1

With the midterm elections less than a week away, science is on voters’ minds even when it’s not on the ballot. From coastal floods in Florida, to the growing pains of renewable energy in Hawaii, to curbing the opioid addiction crisis in Kentucky, diff...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
26.10.2018

Science Goes To The Movies: First Man, Driverless Car Ethics, Beetle Battles. Oct 26, 2018, Part 2

Damien Chazelle’s film First Man reconstructs the personal trials of astronaut Neil Armstrong in the years leading up to his famous first steps on the moon—as well as the setbacks and losses that plagued the U.S. space program along the way. This week ...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
26.10.2018

Blood, Spatial Memory, Gerrymandering. Oct 26, 2018, Part 1

Blood is essential to human life—it runs through all of our bodies, keeping us alive—but the life-giving liquid can also have a mysterious, almost magical quality. As journalist Rose George points out, this association goes back to thousands of years, ...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
19.10.2018

Music And Technology, Social Critters, Sleep And Genetics. Oct 19, 2018, Part 2

Mark Ramos Nishita, more popularly known as Money Mark from the Beastie Boys, has created the “Echolodeon.” The custom-built machine converts original piano rolls, created from actual performances by greats like Debussy and Eubey Blake, into MIDI signa...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
19.10.2018

C-Section Increase, Puerto Rican Hurricane Recovery, A Turtle Tiff. Oct 19, 2018, Part 1

The World Health Organization recommends that the C-section rate should be about 15% of births, for optimal outcomes for mothers and babies. But a series of studies published in The Lancet this week shows that rates worldwide are much higher. In the pa...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
12.10.2018

Squirrel Monkeys, Salmon Migration, The Realness. Oct 12, 2018, Part 2

Squirrel monkeys have big brains for their size, they’re chatterboxes, and they’ve even been to space. There may even be parallels between squirrel monkey communication and the evolution of human language, says primatologist Anita Stone. She joins Ira ...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
12.10.2018

Election Security, Channel Islands, IPCC Report. Oct 12, 2018, Part 1

The voting infrastructure is a vast network that includes voting machines, registration systems, e-poll books, and result reporting systems. This summer, the federal government put out a report that stated that hackers, possibly connected to Russia, ta...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author
5.10.2018

Dung Beetles, Exomoon, Poison Squad. Oct 5, 2018, Part 2

Before the U.S. Food and Drug Administration was formed in 1906, you might have been more weary of pouring milk over your morning cereal. Milk could be spiked with formaldehyde, while pepper could contain coconut shells, charred rope or floor sweepings...
Science Friday and WNYC Studios author