The Documentary

The best of BBC World Service documentaries and other factual programmes.

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Website
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02nq0lx
Description
The best of BBC World Service documentaries and other factual programmes.
Language
🇬🇧 English
last modified
2019-08-20 21:54
last episode published
2019-08-20 16:47
publication frequency
1.79 days
Contributors
BBC owner  
BBC World Service author  
Explicit
false
Number of Episodes
845
Rss-Feeds
Detail page
Categories
Society & Culture History News & Politics

Recommendations


Episodes

Date Thumb Title & Description Contributors
20.08.2019

Her Story 2: Betty Bigombe, Ugandan peace negotiator

Betty Bigombe spent much of her career trying to negotiate peace with the notorious warlord Joseph Kony. She was born in northern Uganda as one of 11 children. Betty focused on her education from an early age. She won a fellowship at Harvard where she ...
BBC World Service author
15.08.2019

Barbuda: Storms, recovery and ‘land grabs’

Who will shape the future of the hurricane-hit, tropical isle of Barbuda? In 2017, category-5 hurricane Irma devastated much of Barbuda’s ‘paradise’ landscape, and its infrastructure. The national government – based on the larger, neighbouring island...
BBC World Service author
14.08.2019

Peterloo: The massacre that changed Britain

On 16 August 1819, troops charged the crowds in St Peter's Field - 18 people lost their lives and around 700 were injured. Within days, the press were referring to it as "The Peterloo Massacre" after the battle of Waterloo just four years earlier. The ...
BBC World Service author
13.08.2019

Vaira Viķe-Freiberga: The first female president of Latvia

Vaira Viķe-Freiberga became the first female president of Latvia in 1999, just eight months after returning to the country she left 54 years earlier. A dramatic childhood saw her leave Riga with her family in 1944, aged seven, after the Soviet invasion...
BBC World Service author
8.08.2019

Genoa's Broken Bridge

An icon of Italian design; a centrepiece of a community; a tragedy waiting to happen? When the Morandi bridge opened in 1967, it was one of the longest concrete bridges in the world, connecting the port of Genoa with the rest of Italy and Italy with no...
BBC World Service author
6.08.2019

Black girls don't swim

Seren Jones swam competitively for 13 years in the UK and in the US collegiate system. But in that time she only ever saw six other black girls in the pool. Why so few? A survey published by the University of Memphis and USA Swimming found that black r...
BBC World Service author
1.08.2019

America's Hospital Emergency

A small town goes on life-support after its lone hospital closes. The story of Jamestown, Tennessee, recorded in the emotional hours and days after its 85-bed facility shut. Rural hospitals are closing across the United States, leaving patients dangero...
BBC World Service author
30.07.2019

The spy of Raspberry Falls

Kevin Mallory lived a double life - he helped people on his street with yard work, went to church and showed off his dogs. Yet at home he communicated with Chinese agents through social media and sold them US secrets. Tara McKelvey tells the story of h...
BBC World Service author
28.07.2019

When Africa meets China

Everyone knows how China is changing Africa but what is less well known is how Africa is changing China. Linda Yueh uncovers the growing number of African’s who are moving to work and live in China. She investigates problems some African’s are having o...
BBC World Service author
25.07.2019

The Spy in Your Pocket

Anti-obesity campaigners in Mexico, human rights advocates in London, and friends of the murdered journalist Jamal Khashoggi all claim they’ve been targeted by surveillance software normally used by law enforcement to track drug-dealers and terrorists....
BBC World Service author
23.07.2019

Monolingual societies

Simon Calder meets speakers of indigenous languages (like Welsh in Britain), of dialects (like Moselfrankish in Germany) and vernaculars (like African-American Vernacular English, in the US). These speakers all use the mainstream language every day, bu...
BBC World Service author
21.07.2019

Music to land on the Moon by

On the 50th anniversary of the first Moon landings, Beatriz De La Pava researches how real life events are reflected in the lyrics of popular songs, and shows how music can paint a vivid picture of the social, political, economic, and cultural landscap...
BBC World Service author
20.07.2019

Tuku Music

Oliver Mtukudzi was loved by people all over the world for his unique melodies – and by Zimbabweans for the messages of hope contained in his lyrics. There was a huge outpouring of grief when he died on 23 January 2019. His songs spoke out against wome...
BBC World Service author
18.07.2019

Bitter brew

With the rise in ethical consumerism, Assignment explores the hidden suffering of tea workers in Africa. Attacked because of their tribal identity, reporter Anna Cavell hears harrowing stories of murder, rape and violence and asks whether more could, o...
BBC World Service author
16.07.2019

Multilingual societies

What is it like to live in a place where you have to speak several languages to get by? Simon Calder travels to India, where a top university only teaches in English, the one language that the students from all over the country have in common. And he m...
BBC World Service author
14.07.2019

The Dyatlov Pass mystery

In 1959, a group of nine Russian students met a mysterious death in the Ural mountains. Experienced cross-country skiers, their bodies were found scattered around a campsite, their tent cut from the inside, as they seemingly panicked to escape from som...
BBC World Service author
11.07.2019

Germany’s climate change frontline

The beautiful Hambacher Forest is disappearing. Over the past four decades, it has been slowly devoured by a voracious coalmine in the German Rhineland. The forest has become a powerful symbol of climate change resistance. Protesters have been staging ...
BBC World Service author
9.07.2019

The Superlinguists: How to learn a language

Simon Calder asks how to go about acquiring a new tongue. He gets tips from those who know - innovative teachers and polyglots. The answers are surprising. At school, it is repetitive drills, shouted out loud by the whole class, that seem to lodge the ...
BBC World Service author
4.07.2019

Denmark's Migrant Ghettos

Denmark's efforts to better integrate its migrant population are attracting controversy at home, and abroad. Twenty nine housing districts, known as 'migrant ghettos', are now subject to special measures to tackle crime and unemployment, and encourage ...
BBC World Service author
2.07.2019

The polyglots

Simon Calder meets people who keep learning new languages not because they have to, but because they want to. What motivates them? Situations like this - an immigrant hotel cleaner who is moved to tears because you speak to her in her native Albanian; ...
BBC World Service author
30.06.2019

Interview with the Dalai Lama

In a wide ranging interview the Dalai Lama talks to the BBC’s Rajini Vaidyanathan about President Trump and his America First agenda, Brexit, the EU, and China’s relationship with the world. The interview also challenges some of the Buddhist spiritual ...
BBC World Service author
30.06.2019

Training to save the treasures of Iraq - part two

Shaimaa Khalil is reunited with eight women from Mosul after their training in London. She hears about the work the archaeologists are doing now to assess the damage to Iraq's heritage sites like the iconic Al Nuri mosque and minaret, which Islamic Sta...
BBC World Service author
29.06.2019

Marching to the coolest beat

An unlikely pageant takes place every year in the American Rust Belt town of Dayton Ohio. Three hundred teams of high school and college students have made it to the finals of a national competition known as the Colour Guard. In a giant sports arena, t...
BBC World Service author
27.06.2019

Marseille: France’s Crumbling City

On the 5th November last year, two apartment buildings collapsed in Marseille’s historic centre. Eight people died in a tragedy which has sent shockwaves through France’s second city, and the country. The accident shed light on something that resident...
BBC World Service author
25.06.2019

The magic fingers of Rashid Khan

Rashid Khan was born in Nangarhar in Eastern Afghanistan in 1998 but his early life was spent in a refugee camp in Pakistan away from the conflict that has swept across his homeland for decades. He grew up playing cricket with his ten siblings eventual...
BBC World Service author
24.06.2019

A History of Music and Technology: The Future

Pink Floyd's Nick Mason ends his series by exploring where music technology is heading and discovers how innovation is shaping the way we make, listen and interact with music. He reveals how artificial intelligence is taking human input out of musical...
BBC World Service author
23.06.2019

Training to save the treasures of Iraq

For three years Mosul was occupied by the extremist group known as the Islamic State. During the occupation which lasted until July 2017, the group destroyed many important ancient sites with hammers, bulldozers and explosives. Work is now beginning to...
BBC World Service author
20.06.2019

Dying from mistrust in Ukraine

Until recently, health authorities in developed countries appeared to be well on the way to wiping out measles – a highly contagious disease that’s one of the leading causes of vaccine-preventable deaths, particularly in children. But now measles is on...
BBC World Service author
19.06.2019

Vaccination: The global picture

The Wellcome Trust reveals how attitudes towards vaccinations vary around the world in its Global Monitor. The most vaccine-sceptical country is France – because of scares around vaccines. In neighbouring Germany one state has approved plans to make va...
BBC World Service author
18.06.2019

Destination education

Despite the political uncertainty in the UK at the moment the country’s reputation for top-class education, if you can afford it, is still on the rise. Liyang Liu meets two very different school children who have travelled thousands of miles to go to p...
BBC World Service author
18.06.2019

A History of Music and Technology: The Studio Part 2

Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason continues the story of the recording studio, exploring how bands such as The Beatles and The Beach Boys brought avant-garde production techniques into the mainstream during the 1960s. The programme also charts the role jazz and...
BBC World Service author
18.06.2019

A History of Music and Technology: The Studio Part 1

The recording studio has changed dramatically since the advent of sound recording - as has our understanding of the ‘perfect take’. In the first of two programmes about the history of the studio, Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason explores the limitations of the...
BBC World Service author
18.06.2019

A History of Music and Technology: Samplers and Drum Machines

Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason explores how samplers and drum machines created new musical genres. During the 1980s, samplers and drum machines fuelled a new wave of music from hip hop to house to techno. In this programme we hear from the inventors behind ...
BBC World Service author
18.06.2019

A History of Music and Technology: The Synthesizer

The first synthesizer was so big, it filled an entire room, but during the 1960s inventors built downsized machines which would go on to revolutionise pop music. Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason charts the work of synth pioneers Bob Moog, Don Buchla and Dave S...
BBC World Service author
18.06.2019

A History of Music and Technology: The Hammond Organ

Pink Floyd's Nick Mason tells the story of Laurens Hammond and the musical legacy of the instrument which bears his name. The Hammond Organ is arguably the first mass-market electronic instrument and in this episode we head to the heart of the Hammond...
BBC World Service author
18.06.2019

A History of Music and Technology: The Electric Guitar

Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason tells the story of the electric guitar, revealing how a frying pan, a railroad track and the paradise island of Hawaii all played a role in its evolution. He charts how the desire to get louder fundamentally altered the instrum...
BBC World Service author
18.06.2019

A History of Music and Technology: Electronic Music Pioneers

For centuries music was made by strumming strings, blowing horns and banging drums - but at the turn of the 20th Century, the harnessing of electricity meant artists and inventors could create all-new tones and timbres. In this programme, Pink Floyd's...
BBC World Service author
18.06.2019

A History of Music and Technology: Sound Recording

Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason tells the story of how we first captured sound, giving birth to a global recording industry. While music has advanced in its complexity over the millennia, the means of recording it remained the same: it had to be written down....
BBC World Service author
16.06.2019

Remembering Afghanistan's Elvis

Ahmad Zahir with his dark shock of hair, sultry voice and overwhelming stage presence more than earned the nickname "The Afghan Elvis". He remains Afghanistan’s most beloved musician even though he died at the age of 33 after a short, dazzling career. ...
BBC World Service author
13.06.2019

Morocco’s hash trail to Europe

In Amsterdam’s cafes, you can buy hashish openly, over the counter. But go around back to see how the drug comes in, and you’ll get a lot of smoke blown in your face. The entire supply chain is illegal. BBC Arabic’s Emir Nader holds his breath and trac...
BBC World Service author
11.06.2019

Falling Rock

Jacob Rosales, a 20-year-old student at Yale, takes a closer look at some of the varied challenges facing Native American young people today. With alarmingly high rates of alcohol abuse, suicide and unemployment, Jacob delves behind the stats to reveal...
BBC World Service author
9.06.2019

Ticket to a new life

Ana is a winner in the annual Pacific Access Category ballot. It is a visa lottery. Each year, Tonga gets up to 250 places, Fiji the same, and there are up to 75 each for Tuvalu and Kiribati. In a separate draw, 1100 visas are available in the Samoan Q...
BBC World Service author
8.06.2019

Praying for petrol

In a country infamous for its drug cartels, Mexico has another booming black market - petrol. Starting out as just a few individuals tapping lines to sell to their local communities, petrol theft has now attracted the heavyweights of organised crime wh...
BBC World Service author
6.06.2019

Turkey’s Political Football

Football in Turkey's biggest city always means colour, passion and noise, but this season has an added edge. The big three Istanbul clubs, which have generally had a vice-like grip on the Super Lig crown are this year facing a new challenger, another c...
BBC World Service author
4.06.2019

Don't hide my son

The Tanzanian mothers forced to hide their children with Down syndrome due to social stigma and their defiant determination to change this.
BBC World Service author
30.05.2019

Sudan’s White-Coated Uprising

Sudan’s doctors on the frontline. When ongoing street protests finally pushed Sudan’s repressive president from power last month, it was the country’s doctors many thanked. Ever since Omar al-Bashir’s successful coup in 1989 they had defied him. Stagin...
BBC World Service author
29.05.2019

After the boats

During the migrant crisis, thousands of Nigerian women were trafficked into Italy for sexual exploitation. In 2016 alone, 11,000 made the perilous journey through lawless Libya and then in flimsy boats across the Mediterranean. Naomi Grimley asks what ...
BBC World Service author
26.05.2019

Beyond Borders: Seeking Safety

For over five years, British-Lebanese journalist Zahra Mackaoui has been following the stories of a group of Syrians, who have scattered across the world in search of safety. She originally met and interviewed them in the early years of the long-runnin...
BBC World Service author
25.05.2019

Amar: Alone in the world

He was known as “the little boy who lost everything”. In 1991, Amar Kanim’s disfigured face was shown on newspaper front pages around the world, an innocent young victim of Saddam Hussein’s brutal regime. His entire family, it was reported, had died in...
BBC World Service author
23.05.2019

The Undercover Migrant

The extraordinary story of an undercover migrant and his ‘secret spectacles’. When Azeteng, a young man from rural Ghana, heard stories on the radio of West African migrants dying on their way to Europe, he felt compelled to act. He took what little s...
BBC World Service author