BBC Inside Science

Dr Adam Rutherford and guests illuminate the mysteries and challenge the controversies behind the science that's changing our world.

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Website
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b036f7w2
Description
Dr Adam Rutherford and guests illuminate the mysteries and challenge the controversies behind the science that's changing our world.
Language
🇬🇧 English
last modified
2019-06-26 00:00
last episode published
2019-06-20 16:00
publication frequency
7.23 days
Contributors
BBC owner  
BBC Radio 4 author  
Explicit
false
Number of Episodes
302
Rss-Feeds
Detail page
Categories
Science & Medicine

Recommendations


Episodes

Date Thumb Title & Description Contributors
20.06.2019

Rinderpest destruction, Noise and birdsong, Science as entertainment

Rinderpest – Sequence and Destroy Last week the UK’s Pirbright Institute announced that it had destroyed its remaining stocks of the deadly cattle virus Rinderpest. This repository was one of the biggest remaining stores of it since it was announced in...
BBC Radio 4 author
13.06.2019

Net-Zero carbon target, Science Policy Under Thatcher, Screen time measures

Net-Zero Carbon Target The UK is set to become the first member of the G7 industrialised nations group to legislate for net-zero emissions after Theresa May’s announcement this week. The proposed legislation would commit the UK’s greenhouse gas emissio...
BBC Radio 4 author
6.06.2019

CCR5 Mutation Effects, The Surrey Earthquake Swarm, Animal Emotions

Some people have a genetic mutation in a gene called CCR5 that seems to bestow immunity to a form of HIV. This is the mutation which controversial Chinese scientist Jianqui He tried to bestow upon two baby girls last year when he edited the genes in em...
BBC Radio 4 author
30.05.2019

How maths underpins science

Adam Rutherford and guests at the Hay Festival discuss how maths underwrites all branches of science, and is at the foundation of the modern world. His guests are the following. Professor Steve Strogatz, of Cornell University, the author of a new b...
BBC Radio 4 author
23.05.2019

New CFC emissions, Cannabis and the Environment, The Noisy Cocktail Party, Automated Face Recognition

New CFC emissions Researchers say that they have pinpointed the major sources of a mysterious recent rise in a dangerous, ozone-destroying chemical. CFC-11 was primarily used for home insulation but global production was due to be phased out in 2010. B...
BBC Radio 4 author
16.05.2019

Hubble Not-So Constant, Synthetic E. Coli, The Adventures of Alexander von Humboldt

The Hubble Constant The Hubble constant is the current expansion rate of the universe but it seems to have changed over time. Hiranya Peiris, Professor of Astrophysics from University College London and Adam Riess, Professor of Physics and Astronomy fr...
BBC Radio 4 author
9.05.2019

Forensic science provision, optimal garden watering strategy, and a mystery knee bone

A damning House of Lords' report into the provision of forensic science in England and Wales makes for uncomfortable reading for some but is broadly welcomed by those in the field. Prof. Niamh Nic Daeid, one of many who gave evidence to the Science and...
BBC Radio 4 author
2.05.2019

Sex, gender and sport - the Caster Semenya case and the latest Denisovan discovery

In 2018, the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) introduced new eligibility regulations for female athletes with differences in sex development (DSDs). These regulations are based on the contention that women with high levels of e...
BBC Radio 4 author
25.04.2019

Thought-to-speech machine, City Nature Challenge, Science of Storytelling

Patients who suffer neurological impairments preventing them from speaking potentially face a severely limited existence. Being able to express yourself in real time is a large part of our identity. In the journal Nature this week, scientists from the ...
BBC Radio 4 author
18.04.2019

Notre-Dame fire, Reviving pig brains, ExoMars, Evolution of faces

The horror of the blazing Notre-Dame cathedral in Paris has been slightly quenched by the fact that so much of the French landmark has been saved. But what was it about the structure of the roof, with some the beams dating from the 13th century, that m...
BBC Radio 4 author
11.04.2019

Visualising a black hole, Homo luzonensis, Two ways to overcome antimicrobial resistance

"We have now seen the unseeable" according to scientists who are part of the Event Horizon Telescope group. The international team has released a picture of the first black hole. Data gathered from an array of over 8 radio telescopes has been crunched ...
BBC Radio 4 author
4.04.2019

Cretaceous catastrophe fossilised, LIGO and Virgo, Corals, Forensic shoeprint database

About 66 million years ago an asteroid at least 6 miles wide crashed into the Earth, in the shallow sea that is now the Yucatan Peninsular in Mexico. It gouged the Chicxulub crater 18 miles deep; threw 25 trillion tonnes of debris into the atmosphere, ...
BBC Radio 4 author
28.03.2019

UK pollinating insect numbers, Tracking whales using barnacles, Sleep signals

One of the longest running insect pollinator surveys in the world, shows that a few generalist pollinators are on the increase, whereas specialist insects are declining. Using data collected by volunteers across Great Britain to map the spatial loss of...
BBC Radio 4 author
21.03.2019

Where next World Wide Web? Space rocks and worms

30 years ago Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web as a way to let physicists share their papers and data on a distributed network. It's changed a lot since then and not all for the better. Dominant technology companies monopolise our data and ma...
BBC Radio 4 author
14.03.2019

Rules and ethics of genome editing, Gender, sex and sport, Hog roasts at Stonehenge

When the news broke last December that Chinese biophysicist He Jiankui had successfully edited the genomes of twin girls using the technique known as CRISPR-Cas9, scientists and the public were rightly outraged that such a procedure had taken place. Ji...
BBC Radio 4 author
7.03.2019

A cure for HIV? Sleepy flies, Secrets of the Fukushima disaster, Science fact checking

An HIV-1 sufferer, who had developed aggressive cancer, and underwent a revolutionary stem cell transplant, has been declared HIV resistant. It's been 18 months since the 'London patient' underwent a stem cell transplant of donated HIV resistant cells....
BBC Radio 4 author
28.02.2019

Falling carbon and rising methane; Unsung heroes at the Crick

Efforts to cut emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and tackle climate change in many developed economies are beginning to pay off, according to research led by Corinne Le Quere at the Tyndall Centre at the University of East Anglia. The study suggests th...
BBC Radio 4 author
21.02.2019

Mars - rovers v humans? Forests and carbon, Ethiopian bush crow

Nasa have called time on the 14 year mission with the Mars Opportunity rover. Curiosity is still there. But what's next for our exploration of the Red planet? Adam asks Senior Strategist in Space Systems at Airbus, Liz Seward and BBC space corresponden...
BBC Radio 4 author
14.02.2019

Insect decline, Gut microbiome, Geomagnetic switching

A very strongly worded, meta-review paper (looking at 73 historical reports from around the world published over the past 13 years) has just been published looking at the fate of insects around the world. The researchers have collated other people’s re...
BBC Radio 4 author
7.02.2019

Sea Level Rise, Equine Flu, Generator Bricks, Iberian Genes

In 2016 some scientists suggested that with climate change so much ice in Antarctica could melt that the global sea level could rise up to a metre. There would be an "ice apocalypse". Now another group has refined the models and in a paper published th...
BBC Radio 4 author
31.01.2019

Sprinting Neanderthals, Geodynamo, Spreading Sneezes and Dying Hares

Many physical features of Neanderthals might not be for cold climate adaptation as previously thought. They may be for types of locomotion. Which, according to paleo-ecologist, John Stewart at Bournemouth University, makes the long thigh to calf ratios...
BBC Radio 4 author
24.01.2019

Leonardo's drawings, Super-Mendelian inheritance in mice, The Weddell Sea Expedition

In February The Royal Collection will be holding the largest exhibition of Leonardo da Vinci’s work in more than 65 years to mark the 500th anniversary of his death. Adam Rutherford gets up close and personal with some of Leonardo's drawings in the Roy...
BBC Radio 4 author
17.01.2019

Clean Air Strategy, Fast Radio Bursts and Kuba Kingdom

With the publication of the UK Government’s Clear Air Strategy this week, Professor of atmospheric chemistry at the University of York, Alastair Lewis, discusses with Adam Rutherford about whether the guidelines go far enough. It’s a hugely complex is...
BBC Radio 4 author
10.01.2019

Antarctic lake drilling, Birds and climate change, Cold snap, Holograms

Sampling from subglacial lakes under the ice in Antarctica can hopefully tell us a lot about past climates as well as reveal organisms that have evolved in extreme environment, long separated from the rest of the world. However it's not easy work, dril...
BBC Radio 4 author
3.01.2019

Ultima Thule, Dry January, Periodic Table

2019 means the opportunity to explore the most distant object yet encountered in our solar system – the brilliantly named Ultima Thule as Nasa’s New Horizons spacecraft hit the headlines this week when it flew past an object 4 billion miles away, took ...
BBC Radio 4 author
27.12.2018

First stars, Life on Mars, Climate update, Control of CRISPR, Jamestown forensic genetics

Adam Rutherford and guests discuss 2018 in space, climate science and genetics and listeners' questions. Dr Emma Chapman of Imperial College chooses the discovery by the EDGES telescope of the first stars as her highlight of the year and answers a que...
BBC Radio 4 author
20.12.2018

Fish Farming and Climate Change, Gigantic Fungus, Robot Swarms, Gaming in Schools, Drones

Wester Ross Fisheries says over half the salmon at one of its sites have been wiped out because of high seawater temperatures. This highlights yet another damaging effect of climate change, at a time when aquaculture is playing an ever-greater role in ...
BBC Radio 4 author
13.12.2018

Control of AI, Deep carbon, ICESat-2, Autonauts in Antarctica, Rapid evolution in Khoe San

We are now in an age where big decisions about our lives, from health care to recruitment, are being governed by computer programmes and data. The Royal Society has been running a series of events in its ongoing “You and AI” series and the most recent...
BBC Radio 4 author
6.12.2018

Greenland ice sheet melting; Gingko biloba and CO2; Jodrell Bank and quantum compass

The rate the Greenland Ice Sheet is melting is possibly the highest in 8000 years. New work looking at layers of melt in ice cores, from the second biggest ice sheet in the world, has shown that in the past 20 years the rate of melting has increased by...
BBC Radio 4 author
29.11.2018

Gene-edited twins, Placenta organoids in a dish, When the last leaves drop

Claims by a Chinese scientist that he has gene-edited human embryos, transplanted them producing genetically edited twins, who will pass on these changes to their offspring, has the scientific community outraged. The work, which was carried out in secr...
BBC Radio 4 author
22.11.2018

Mars InSight mission, Detecting dark matter, Redefining the kilogram, Bovine TB

The Government's strategy to eradicate TB in cattle is a contentious topic. The disease is extremely complicated and lots of people have different ideas on how to manage it. Professor of Zoonotic and Emerging Disease at the University of Nottingham, Ma...
BBC Radio 4 author
15.11.2018

Bovine TB and badger culling, Shrimp hoover CSI, Shark-skin and Turing

The Bovine TB Strategy Review has just been released. It contains a review of the science and offers advice and guidance to Government ministers on how to eradicate this costly and hard to manage disease in cattle. Controversially it does not include t...
BBC Radio 4 author
8.11.2018

Oldest cave picture; the Anthropocene under London; a new scientist for the £50 note

What could be the oldest figurative cave paintings in the world have been found in a cave complex in remote Borneo. A reddish orange depiction of an animal that could be a Banteng (wild cattle found in the region) is at least 40,000 years old. Humans...
BBC Radio 4 author
1.11.2018

Repairing potholes, ozone hole, internet of hives and drugs from fingerprints.

Potholes are one of the biggest frustrations to any road-user, but why do they keep occurring? Following Philip Hammond’s announcement of £420 million for councils to tackle potholes, Malcolm Simms, Director of the Mineral Products Association’s Asphal...
BBC Radio 4 author
25.10.2018

Science and Brexit, Antibiotic livestock growth promoters, Bepicolombo goes to Mercury

How might Brexit affect UK Science? Why is feeding a 'last resort' antibiotic to farm animals not a good idea? Why is space probe Bepicolombo going to Mercury? Adam Rutherford is your host. This week, leading British and European scientists wrote t...
BBC Radio 4 author
18.10.2018

Old Dogs and Physics in Space

How far back can we trace the ancestry of dogs? For just how long have they been following us around? The answer is for a very long time - long before humans settled down and developed societies. Scientists in France have been looking at ancient dog DN...
BBC Radio 4 author
11.10.2018

11/10/2018

Adam Rutherford speaks to Dr Tamsin Edwards, a lecturer in Physical Geography at Kings College London and a lead author for the latest IPCC report. Dr Edwards describes what happens in the making of the report, including the summarising of the wealth o...
BBC Radio 4 author
4.10.2018

Nobel Prizes - Hayabusa 2 latest - IPCC meeting - North Pole science

Adam Rutherford reviews this year's Nobel science prizes, and talks to Professor Venkatraman Ramakrishnan, a 2009 laureate and president of the Royal Society, about the experience of being tipped as a Nobel winner. This can included a stressful condit...
BBC Radio 4 author
27.09.2018

Hyabusa 2 at Ryugu, deadly 1918 flu pandemic; WW2 bombing and ionosphere, teenage brain

Japan’s Hayabusa-2 spacecraft has arrived after more than a three year journey at the Ryugu asteroid which is just over half a mile long. It has successfully sent probes onto the surface and is sending pictures back to Earth. Gareth Mitchell discusses ...
BBC Radio 4 author
20.09.2018

Science of Addiction

The Science Gallery London at Kings College London, right under the Shard, is a brand new venue for the collision of art, science and culture, and its opening exhibition is called Hooked, a series of installations and works by people who have experienc...
BBC Radio 4 author
13.09.2018

First human drawing, Cycling genes, Oden Arctic expedition, Hello World

Adam Rutherford investigates the news in science and science in the news.
BBC Radio 4 author
6.09.2018

Complexity in Biology

Adam Rutherford takes the show to Dublin this week, to wrestle with great matters of biological complexity. Trinity College Dublin has organised a mass gathering of some of the world's leading researchers in the life sciences to mark the 75th anniversa...
BBC Radio 4 author
30.08.2018

Electronic brain probe; Rural stream biodiversity; Arctic weather research trip; Science book prize

Scientists have shown how an electronic gadget, implanted in the brain, can detect, treat and even prevent epileptic seizures. Epilepsy is usually treated using anti-epilepsy drugs, but can cause serious side-effects. Researchers at the University of C...
BBC Radio 4 author
23.08.2018

Cavendish banana survival; Guillemot egg shape; Unexpected Truth About Animals; Tambora's rainstorm

The last banana you probably ate was a type called Cavendish. But this, our last commercially viable variety is under severe threat, as the fungus, called Tropical Race 4, is laying waste to swathes of Cavendish banana plants across China, Asia and Aus...
BBC Radio 4 author
16.08.2018

Capturing greenhouse gas, Beating heart failure with beetroot, Why elephants don't get cancer, Exactly - a history of precision

Researchers have found a way to produce a naturally occurring mineral, magnesite, in a lab, that can absorb CO2 from the atmosphere, offering a potential strategy for tackling climate change. They've accelerated a process that normally takes thousands ...
BBC Radio 4 author
9.08.2018

New Horizons' next mission, Helium at 150, The Beautiful Cure, Oden arctic expedition

Astronomers this week have been warming up for an encounter as far from the Sun as ever attempted. It's the finale of the New Horizons mission which successfully passed Pluto in 2015 and is now on its way to Ultima Thule - a Kuiper belt object on the e...
BBC Radio 4 author
2.08.2018

Parker solar probe, Diversity in the lab, Royal Society book prize, Arctic circle weather

The sun still has many mysterious properties. The Parker Solar Probe, launched next week will be the closest a spacecraft has ever flown to our star. It's a mission that's been on the drawing board for decades which space scientists have only dreamt of...
BBC Radio 4 author
26.07.2018

Liquid water on Mars, Early embryo development, Earth Biogenome Project, Marine wilderness

The European Space Agency's satellite Mars Express has identified what we think is a subterranean lake of liquid near the south pole of the red planet. The question of water on Mars has been around for years, and we've known about water ice, and there'...
BBC Radio 4 author
19.07.2018

Peatbog wildfires, Coral acoustics, Magdalena Skipper, Fuelling long-term space travel

The wildfires on Saddleworth Moor may well be the most widespread in modern British history. Thanks to herculean efforts by Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service and the military, they are now extinguished, though the peat continues to smoulder. N...
BBC Radio 4 author
12.07.2018

Out of Africa, Predicting future heatwaves, Virtual reality molecules, Life in the dark

Scientists have found the earliest known evidence of a human presence outside Africa. A set of 96 stone tools has been found in the mountains of south-east China, which is the furthest afield this type of tool has been located. The scientists who found...
BBC Radio 4 author